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General Games / Re: Fire Emblem Heroes
« Last post by Hathen on Today at 05:32:15 AM »
I don't think they'll give the Fates kids their parent's weapons for precisely that reason, coming off such a recent announcement of them trying to keep older units semi-relevant (plus Shiro would fit better as lance infantry anyway). It'd also waste an opportunity for them to come up with some ridiculous Prfs just for them.

Also I got 20 orbs again so I tried pulling and was treated to a third board with no greens. This game really seeks to piss me off sometimes. Anyway got a 4* Shanna.
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General Discussions / Re: Whats the haps?
« Last post by Tomara on Today at 04:39:53 AM »
I loved theoretical maths and took advanced maths classes in high school. Since graduation I've used maybe 5% of what I learned in real life, but those classes did break up my school days nicely. I mean, I get to solve fun puzzles and get showered in praise for doing so? Sign me up.

I did follow some subjects that featured much more practical maths though, especially Management & Organisation (which was, ironically, taught by someone named Marx). It focused mostly on running a business, but there was certainly stuff in there that could be used to manage personal finances.

That was at VWO level, by the way. Over half of dutch students are on the VMBO track, and subjects there are a lot more practical. VWO prepares for university, VMBO prepares for life. (Well, actually, VMBO prepares for vocational college, and vocational college courses also feature some life skills courses.) There is HAVO as well, which lies somewhere in the middle of VWO and VMBO. And VMBO, HAVO and VWO all have different tracks as well. It's complicated, but it does leave some room for individuality.

Speaking of struggles, mine was language related. I wasn't all that great at speaking in primary school (I didn't get many chances to do so and my increasingly low self-esteem wasn't helping either). Teachers thought I was slow because of that and put me with children with learning disabilities when we needed to do group work and such. Those kids tended to be really loud and that made me even more quiet. They didn't find out until our first big standardised test that I was reading at a much higher level than average and was ahead in all other subjects as well.
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General Games / Re: Fire Emblem Heroes
« Last post by Tomara on Today at 03:10:09 AM »
Kiragi

I sort of hope not, because with the powercreep as of late, he'll be superior to his dad in every way and that's just sad :(
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General Discussions / Re: Whats the haps?
« Last post by Electricb7 on Today at 12:04:38 AM »
If I knew that I would need programming skills in the future for writing games or getting any kind of job utilizing computers other than blogging I would have obviously payed more attention or showed more interest in math. But children aren't really interested in numbers and equations that donít do anything. Itís just working your brain but not utilizing the purpose of knowledge witch is to implement it in a meaningful way. And the same goes for engineering. Kids should be supplied with raspberry pie kits or some form of hands on learning material at an early age to better introduce them to the purposes of the applied math. If you show me that I can make Mario or Zelda I'm easily hooked. No need for begging me to do my homework. If you just ask me to do math homework with no foreseeable payoff, stimulation, or reward I'm just going to play JRPG's all day.

I think we have a cultural gap here.  The kind of people who are successful in technical fields generally either like math in its own right, or have the motivation and self-discipline to buckle down and study.  Even if a subject doesn't have any foreseeable application to your future career, bad marks are unpleasant enough.

You didn't know that you needed programming skills to get involved in writing games?  Well, you know now.  You have access to the internet, which has more than enough resources to let you teach yourself programming.  The only thing limiting you is your desire.

I taught myself to program when I was eight.  Not because I wanted to write games, but because as a geekish child I was naturally attracted to electronics.  There was no internet back then to help.  The computer was older than I was, had 16KB* of RAM, and locked up randomly.  Barefoot, in the snow.  Uphill.  Both ways.

*Not a typo.
ehh Its not as simple as drive or desire but I understand what you are saying.
I spend all my free time drawing and learning Photoshop. I put forth he effort but life gets int he way. There are moments when times are hard and you can just shrug stuff off and other times you wont even be able to do the thing you love because shit hits the fan. The later is most of my life.
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General Discussions / Re: Whats the haps?
« Last post by Dincrest on Yesterday at 10:42:38 PM »
When I was taking theoretical math classes in high school, my question was always, "When the hell am I ever going to use this in life?"  I would have benefited more from a Business/Consumer math class that taught me about balancing checkbooks, financing the purchase of a car, applying for a mortgage, credit cards/the importance of maintaining good credit, basically applied mathematics that I can apply to the real world.  I wish I had more of that.  Business/Consumer Math is considered a special-ed math course, yet it's something I think all students would benefit from. 

I never had intentions of being an engineer (which is where calculus would have been useful in real life).  Math was always my poorest subject.  I tended to get Cs and Ds in math despite working twice as hard as the other kids (I may have had an undiagnosed learning disability) whereas I could get As in Language Arts and World Language like it was nothing.  Yet, if I was learning math in a way that made more concrete sense to me, that I could apply to the real world and truly hang my hat on, it would have clicked with me.  The only time I ever used a polar equation was in Precalc class and I've never multiplied cosine times theta since then. 

I'm not a big fan of the blanket "one size fits all" curricula.  To say that "ALL children will learn geometry" like many of these blanket initiatives proclaim is ludicrous.  When you have students with traumatic brain injuries who can barely write their own names without tracing them, do you expect them to learn and comprehend 10th grade geometry at a 10th grade pace?  No.  Those students need life skills, and math is practical- a lot of it is going over counting money so they don't get taken advantage of.  And because of their brain trauma, you sometimes have to go over the same lessons 1000 times over because they have limited powers of retention due to their injuries. 
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General Discussions / Re: Whats the haps?
« Last post by ironmage on Yesterday at 09:46:19 PM »
If I knew that I would need programming skills in the future for writing games or getting any kind of job utilizing computers other than blogging I would have obviously payed more attention or showed more interest in math. But children aren't really interested in numbers and equations that donít do anything. Itís just working your brain but not utilizing the purpose of knowledge witch is to implement it in a meaningful way. And the same goes for engineering. Kids should be supplied with raspberry pie kits or some form of hands on learning material at an early age to better introduce them to the purposes of the applied math. If you show me that I can make Mario or Zelda I'm easily hooked. No need for begging me to do my homework. If you just ask me to do math homework with no foreseeable payoff, stimulation, or reward I'm just going to play JRPG's all day.

I think we have a cultural gap here.  The kind of people who are successful in technical fields generally either like math in its own right, or have the motivation and self-discipline to buckle down and study.  Even if a subject doesn't have any foreseeable application to your future career, bad marks are unpleasant enough.

You didn't know that you needed programming skills to get involved in writing games?  Well, you know now.  You have access to the internet, which has more than enough resources to let you teach yourself programming.  The only thing limiting you is your desire.

I taught myself to program when I was eight.  Not because I wanted to write games, but because as a geekish child I was naturally attracted to electronics.  There was no internet back then to help.  The computer was older than I was, had 16KB* of RAM, and locked up randomly.  Barefoot, in the snow.  Uphill.  Both ways.

*Not a typo.
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Game Journals / Re: A Game Journal Reborn
« Last post by Aeolus on Yesterday at 09:02:39 PM »
Paper Mario: And Luigi Jam.

Past Desert Land and currently island hopping after having beaten Roy and Wendy Koopa. Did anyone take the plunge on the Super Star Saga remake yet? I keep feeling that this game is just lacking compared to that game and its almost LttP style game world (well that or more MM or MC styles where you're mainly operating around a hub; either way it was nice that SSS started you off on the country's border and you promptly worked your way to the hub before your quest began in earnest). It really doesn't help how lacking PJ's world feels compared to SSS (also, 'nother question for y'all plungers out there, did the major SSS original characters like Fawful get replaced by Toads?).

Anyways, I'm almost done with this area and I suspect that I will be moving on to Irwin Allen's Land of the Giants next.
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General Games / Re: Fire Emblem Heroes
« Last post by Aeolus on Yesterday at 08:36:24 PM »
And hell, even if you did get pity broken by Merric, you could always take stock in the fact that you can evolve his Prf into Sonya's Prf which would be marginally better for him (the Wo Dao +10 Dmg effect is more useful to him than having to try to turn his pitiful Atk rating into something usable with Effective magic damage off of enemies with stacked Res; of course you really do need to swap his Special to get anything out of that).

The Brave Unit thing would've pissed me off if it had been either Bowlin or Eliroy who got the 40% role (makes my luck with Mia redundant on top of burning it away from the Legendary Banner), but I'll live with this (it'd be nice if I could pull a Bike or Lancina instead for training purposes and color diversity). At the very least, I'll take this over having an entire Banner to pull one 40% character out of three potential Banner units, one of whom shares the same color as the new one.

As for Fates Gen2 Banner, neither Fates nor Awakening have had any honest to god additions to their rosters since Day 1. Whereas Thracia has the Dire Thunder siblings, and even Radiant Dawn has Sanaki (for whatever she's worth), while only Charlotte, Inigo and Shigure have been kinda sorta added through Event Banners (maybe). Granted, I'd rather have FE4 Gen 2, Thracia or even some Tellus units, but it'd also be nice if they would turn around and make some more Event banner units for some of the older games (Christmas Banner coming up? Cain and Abel in Red and Green Elf costumes, wielding a Candy Cane and a Nativity Set respectfully (because Cane and Stable :V); Eldigan, wielder of the legendary Mistletoe Axe; and Sexy Santa Lyn because every Event Banner requires one of her, Lucina, an Avatar or a Fates Royal).

And while I previously posted my thoughts on potential additions, I listed Selkie who wouldn't fly under FEH's current rule set. So my new picks would be either Shiro, Kiragi, Soleil and Ophelia (mix of genders and nationalities and sticks to relatively popular units, avoids Awakening repeats and gives some okay diversity) or Kanas M & F, Dwyer and Sophie (because also gender equality and totally nation neutral, plus color balance if you give Male Kana a Green Dragonstone and Female Kana Divine Yato; but you're not exactly lighting up the board with popularity).

As for Free pulls, I got a 4 star Matthew on BHeB Banner and a 4 star Raven on T_T Banner. Better keep my luck frosty for the Legendary Banner (plus I feel that 50%'s a good stopping number of Banner pulls, especially since the Legendary's Event Repeats are 75% missed units on top of the overall 66% of available Banner units once the Christmas Queen becomes available).
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General Discussions / Re: Whats the haps?
« Last post by Rucks on Yesterday at 05:12:47 PM »
^ the "payoff" is learning how to deal with being forced to complete tasks you have little to no interest in.  Otherwise known as like 70% of "work".
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General Discussions / Re: Whats the haps?
« Last post by Electricb7 on Yesterday at 04:46:30 PM »
The kicker is that "Business and Consumer Math" and other living-skills type math classes are reserved for students with some sort of special needs IEP or something.  I think a Business and Consumer Math class should be mandatory over more theoretical math courses.  Pythagorean Theorems don't do you much good when you're trying to navigate getting a mortgage for your first home or something.

If a student can't apply the Pythagorean theorem, I doubt they're going to be able to handle compound interest.  Nothing in day-to-day finances requires anything more than basic algebra, and most of it should be covered by fourth-grade arithmetic.

The point of teaching "theoretical" math classes is to develop mental muscle, and the capability to solve general problems.  If your students are getting out of grade 9 unable to figure out how to sum up their expenses, then your system is broken; adding a special class on the subject isn't going to help.

By analogy, it's like suggesting that because students are going to spend vastly more time walking than playing basketball, the P.E. curriculum should focus on walking.  Now, maybe proper walking technique should be taught in P.E., but, as with household finances, I really can't imagine there being more than one or two classes worth of material to cover.

Exactly.
Ive always preached that code/programming, engineering, credit and finances should be mandatory classes in schools. Tech me how to do any of these things over History, or some unorthodox math class and you will most likely have increased my chances off success.

Introductory engineering is basically calculus and physics.  Programming is sequential application of algebra.  Pretty much any math class that employs symbolic reasoning will serve as a good start for those fields, even if the practical application for that particular type of math isn't immediately apparent.

True but the formula is setup for failure. If I knew that I would need programming skills in the future for writing games or getting any kind of job utilizing computers other than blogging I would have obviously payed more attention or showed more interest in math. But children aren't really interested in numbers and equations that donít do anything. Itís just working your brain but not utilizing the purpose of knowledge witch is to implement it in a meaningful way. And the same goes for engineering. Kids should be supplied with raspberry pie kits or some form of hands on learning material at an early age to better introduce them to the purposes of the applied math. If you show me that I can make Mario or Zelda I'm easily hooked. No need for begging me to do my homework. If you just ask me to do math homework with no foreseeable payoff, stimulation, or reward I'm just going to play JRPG's all day.


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