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 1 
 on: Today at 06:59:40 AM 
Started by Eusis - Last post by Ranadiel
Just beat chapter 3 of Danganronpa Another Episode. JESUS! I am in shock that they went there. O.o I really don't know what you can say about a backstory like that. I have to wonder if boss 3 has the most disturbing backstory or if they are somehow going to ratchet it up somehow for bosses 4 and 5...

 2 
 on: Today at 05:28:29 AM 
Started by Tomara - Last post by Maxximum
Millennium series (not very familiair with Aldorlea's stuff, have they made something more noteworthy?)
You should definitively mention Laxius series. There would be no Aldorlea without it.

And if you want some RM2K tips, Three The Hard Way was my favourite. (Except from the Laxius Power, that is).

I always appreciated the work that went into those, but couldn't stomach actually playing the games. Something about them rubbed me the wrong way. Do keep in mind that I only had contact with the pre-commercial Laxius titles.

 3 
 on: Today at 04:57:40 AM 
Started by Maxximum - Last post by Maxximum
Best of luck with this one!

I say that, because I probably won't read this. I do plan on eventually getting around to playing it one of these days, so I don't want to spoil anything for myself.

Anyway, have fun!

I don't intend to give the whole game away, this is a first impressions thread that will eventually lead up to a more formal full game review :)

NPC chatting in Grandia II is both a blessing and a curse for the OCD, because NPCs often have multiple things they say each time you press them for dialogue.  I'm also fond of the dinner chats.

Yep, and it's giving me grief.
NPC's have a tone to say and the dialog can change several times during story event. Dinner chats also appear to branch depending on the order you talk to your party.

 4 
 on: Today at 04:26:28 AM 
Started by Dice - Last post by Aeolus
^I absolutely hate that I love that Death Star headpiece on Samurai Vader.

 5 
 on: Today at 04:18:54 AM 
Started by Nilson - Last post by Aeolus
The Matilda Gate trick is basically like any other Peninsula of Power where you can level grind on enemies way above your intended level curve.

That's mostly true, but the gate trick also gets you access to a high-level town, which means you can nab some wildly good armor and (IIRC) weapon upgrades. And if you're following the walkthrough I did, you also recruit some characters from that area before returning to the prescribed path, and those characters are even more OP than your main party at that point, especially if you don't have the time to really grind out levels (just get enough to survive the world map, usually).

I would guess that the Matilda Gate trick cuts, potentially, more hours out of S2's 108 stars play than most other "Peninsula of Power" areas do in other RPGs. But I could be wrong. I don't often run to the sweet exploits in RPGs because I don't often look up info until after I beat games. Suiko2 was an exception because I knew what I wanted when I started. :)

Except that, the best way to use the Matilda Gate trick is to use it in conjunction with the level up/game over trick (where everything but exp/levels gained is reset back to what you had when you made your last save; which includes equipment and weapon levels among other things, but also includes the play clock). Just going through level 10~15 content with level 45~50 characters makes steamrolling everything a fair bit faster (bonus points if you've gotten a Fury rune or two in that valley between Jowston and Highland, you can slap that onto one of Nami or Riou's newly opened up Rune Slots and just punch things to death from the word go until the Tinto or Greenhill arcs).

At any rate, you really don't want to be screwing around in Matilda too much using the Gate trick since it takes a goodly while to get to your Castle from when you can access it and your inventory space will be hurting enough as it is (and you might accidentally trip another bug that might cost you the recruitable Matilda characters (since you are screwing around with recruiting people well before you have a Castle to send them to) and thus the 108 Stars ending).

 6 
 on: September 04, 2015, 11:44:25 PM 
Started by Dice - Last post by Dice
^ What's important is NOT what's in your badonk-a-donk... but that it's as good as your badonk-a-thunk.
The Kirika figure coming up from Shining Res looks good too.

The Fran Play Arts is pretty damn amazing looking.


And, as always, the Darth Samurai

 7 
 on: September 04, 2015, 10:59:36 PM 
Started by Nilson - Last post by Ramza
The Matilda Gate trick is basically like any other Peninsula of Power where you can level grind on enemies way above your intended level curve.

That's mostly true, but the gate trick also gets you access to a high-level town, which means you can nab some wildly good armor and (IIRC) weapon upgrades. And if you're following the walkthrough I did, you also recruit some characters from that area before returning to the prescribed path, and those characters are even more OP than your main party at that point, especially if you don't have the time to really grind out levels (just get enough to survive the world map, usually).

I would guess that the Matilda Gate trick cuts, potentially, more hours out of S2's 108 stars play than most other "Peninsula of Power" areas do in other RPGs. But I could be wrong. I don't often run to the sweet exploits in RPGs because I don't often look up info until after I beat games. Suiko2 was an exception because I knew what I wanted when I started. :)

 8 
 on: September 04, 2015, 10:52:33 PM 
Started by Ramza - Last post by Ramza
http://indivisiblegame.com/blog/battling-in-indivisible/

This is that game from the team who made Skullgirls. They're making an RPG with a combat system very much akin to Valkyrie Profile, but with an animation style that looks like SkullGirls.

And yes, that's Kikuta music in the background.

For super-early asset prototypes, it makes me just want to gobble up the game. Between this game and the Banner Saga trilogy (can't wait for pt 2!), well-animated 2D RPGs from the West are pickin' up again. And I'm psyched about it.

 9 
 on: September 04, 2015, 10:20:16 PM 
Started by Meredius - Last post by MeshGearFox
- Just Cause 2 is too open in the sense that you can get a helicopter early on and take out everything from a safe distance. The game gives you other options for causing destruction but they're not really that efficient comparatively. It gets boring at this point because it's basically a "solved" game.

- My issue with Just Cause 2 speaks more to my issue about open-world games. You need some kind of constraints on /what/ you can do to force you to make interesting decisions. If you don't have those constraints, you'll quickly find a single perfect strategy and just go with that all the time.

I feel like Open World games are made for people who would put constraints on themselves. They're a sandbox, and while there can one easy way to make a sand castle, what's the point if you're just gonna do what's easy? That's the type of mentality that gets me to enjoy these kinds of games, at least. But I'm the guy who can't play Pokemon without a zillion self-made rules and objectives, because that's the only thing that keeps me invested, to the point where it's literally the only franchise I'll consistantly complete without a break.

0.
It's more like JC2 kind of went overboard with it for my tastes. Same reason why I didn't like Saints Row 3 as much as 2, although I'm not sure WHAT constraints you could put on SR3 to make it... not have a completely uneven difficulty sinewave.

I think my bigger issue with JC2 is that the main advancement mechanic of causing chaos got pretty one note pretty fast because it just turned into "blow up whatever map objects are red," which meant that doing stuff on foot involved a lot of tedious and methodical searching, whereas helicopter was just strafe whatever and win. Although I've /never/ been the kind of person to get much enjoyment out of random acts of destruction in sandbox games -- I'll do it and it's fun for a few minutes, but making the entire metagame nothing BUT that*?

And then death didn't seem to have any major punishments other than sending you back to the previous checkpoint, so the whole aspect of /losing the heat/ felt pointless to, and that could've been an interesting scenario to play through.

(*Although I guess I'm an idiot for playing the GTA games/Morrowind normally and not just turning on all the cheats and ignoring the main game).

1.
And apropos to what jawsh was saying about XBC, being open-world shouldn't mean the story's worse in a game than in a linear game. An open-world game that's story-focused and well made in that regard would have sidequests that expand the story/worldbuilding/characterization/etc. Xenoblade's sidequests not doing this at all is /noooot/ indicative of how sidequests usually play out in open-world RPGs.

1.5
Most sidequests-heavy WRPGs, especially modern ones, have a LOT of storytelling and worldbuilding content in the sidequests, and for a lot of people, the story is the draw there. I mean I don't even think you really get major loot/experience rewards for doing sidequests in WRPGs these days, experiencing the stories therein is like the only reason to do them.

In other words, someone who was drawn to Torment/Ultima/Fallout/The Witcher because of the storytelling and lore would probably /not/ find much merit in XBC for the exact reasons you mentioned.

2.
Although, for a lot of reasons, I wouldn't even consider Xenoblade an open-world game. It was pretty much a bog standard linear JRPG that just had huge maps with very little to do in them.

3.
It's sidequest were also reductionist enough that I'm not sure I'd even consider most of them sidequests. You're, what, just running around in circles grinding mobs/random map sparklies for loot? That's about as much a sidequest as walking around in circles to get in random encounters was in Phantasy Star 2. Or you just do them incidentally, which is actually how it plays out most of the time, in which case it's more like you're getting random experience boosts for not doing anything.

4.
(Persona 3's sidequests tended towards the same kind of GRIND RANDOM ENEMIES FOR LOOT stuff, which is one of the things that killed my interest in that game).

5.
tl;dr -
JC2's problem for me is that it was too repetitive for its size, although that's quite possibly a premature assessment and I never fiddled with the difficulty settings.
XBC is more like an awkward approximation of an open-world game that got grafted onto a linear JRPG, didn't really get the open-world stuff right, and is nooooot indicative of open-world games in general.

 10 
 on: September 04, 2015, 10:06:27 PM 
Started by Eusis - Last post by Draak
Just finished the first campaign in NWN2.

It started alright, but it was so packed full with badly executed fantasy cliches, trash fights, excessive padding (eg, the whole Blacklake quest) and bugs (in true Obsidian fashion, ofc) that by the end I was sour on the whole thing. Didn't like the gameplay too, but I never had the patience to learn the D&D ruleset so I half expected that. What took me by surprise was the solid VA work, Bishop and Garius were damn good.

Next on my plate is MoTB. Hopefully it'll fare a bit better than the OC.

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