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Author Topic: The Line Between Creator and Creation  (Read 726 times)
Ashton
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« on: April 13, 2012, 12:36:36 AM »

Required reading.

Where is your personal line for the divide between creator and creation? Many people have recommended Ender's Game to me, but I refuse to buy the books because I think Orson Scott Card is a tool. Having read this article, I'm not so sure I'd be able to fully enjoy or bother buying any Dragon Quest game ever again. Some might say that I'm just a moron for involving personal agendas, but I say that personal agendas and opinions make the (wo)man.

Thoughts?
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ZeronHitaro
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« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2012, 12:54:08 AM »

I think some degree does go into it; if you're aware and if you feel like holding your ground on any moral standing you might have.

For example; I utterly refuse to spend a dime on anything Tom Cruise is involved in because the man's a Scientologist. If I spend money on that product it means some part of it goes towards encouraging people to give him more work. The more work he gets, the more money he earns. The more money he earns, the more disposable income he has to fund that group. As such by buying a Tom Cruise movie I'm indirectly paying Scientology to exist.

In essence I think it boils down to not so much if said person has views or does actions I disagree with; but rather what they actively do with the money they get from their creations that determines if I draw the line.

In example again:

If creator X is a know mass murder, does his time (somehow), and releases a book on something completely unrelated. I'll buy it if the man's just using the money to make a living.

But if same creator X has all of the above but is presently known as a member of a group that encourages mass murdering, and he actively donates to it; then I won't touch his works with a 60 foot pole. Unless said pole is covered in flaming napalm at the tip.
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Vanguard
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« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2012, 07:17:59 AM »

If you were to boycott works of art based on objection to the moral compass of their creator, you wouldn't have a lot of art left in the world you could support. Picasso was a pretty awful human being, but I can still dig his paintings without feeling like I'm supporting egotism, chauvinism, adultery, and Stalinism.

Likewise, I'm not going to boycott the MTA and not ride the subway because they commissioned sculptures from Tom Otterness, a sculptor who, thirty years ago, bought a dog and filmed himself shooting it to death as an art project.

I generally do believe in the concept of voting with your dollar, but I think this is different than not buying factory farm meat, sweatshop-made clothes, or whatever. Video games are highly collaborative projects. That one person among the group of creators is an awful human being is no surprise and should not color the finished product. I think it's a stretch to say that buying DQ games supports revisionist history.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2012, 09:22:18 AM by Vanguard » Logged

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dyeager
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« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2012, 07:51:08 AM »

I prefer to judge art on its own merit. Sometimes that means removing the creator from the equation. Polanski is mentioned in the article: I can abhor the man but still admire the work.

From my point of view, this is part of having a nuanced opinion. I certainly sympathize with a perspective that wants to keep cash out of the pockets of evil doers, I really can and don't think it's silly in the least. Since video games cost money this can be very tricky. But at the same time keep in mind all the OTHER people that work on something like DQ and make it great. Is it right they should suffer because of one idiot?

I don't actually know the answer to that question, and when you try to unravel good and evil on this type of commercial scale it can get very tricky. Do you boycott the use of cell phones made in China (it ain't just Apple you know). What about PC parts made there? What type of car do you drive? It's important to know where what we buy comes from, but very little of it comes from just one person.

I think personal agendas make the (wo)man, but this is a great example of something more nuanced and complicated than "I don't like this one guy that has something to do with DQ". What's the best way to express yourself here? Is not picking up a copy of Enders Game from the library or something instead of spending money on it the best way to express a stance against Card (he is a tool but it's a damn good book)?

I don't know.
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Agent D.
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« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2012, 07:52:00 AM »

It sort of boils down to you as the viewer/listener/taster/etc. It doesn't matter if you love what you you are listening to or not, if you come into it bitter, you will not enjoy it. A mindset can really change your view of things, which is why it's always better to keep an open mind. I can't tell you how many times I changed my attitude regarding a certain artist's music or game company's product(cough activision) just because of shenanigans they pull. My father had a terrible experience with Steven Tyler of Aerosmith, and it soured my like of his music for life. I once worked as a stagehand at a Franz Ferdinand concert in manhattan, and was given an autographed cd from their monitor engineer, as a thank you for helping her out personally (more my dad than me, guess I should say both of us), so it also works in the opposite way. Again, it all boils down to an open mind really. If you're willing to hear or see or try without bias, that's the way to roll. Otherwise, you've already decided your opinion long ago.
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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2012, 09:10:21 AM »


Likewise, I'm not going to boycott the MTA and not ride the subway because they commissioned sculptures from Tom Otterness, a sculptor who, thirty years ago, bought a dog and filmed himself shooting it to death as an art project.


Great Maker. I've got an idea for an art project... it's called "Battery Acid on Artist"

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