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Author Topic: Book Thread Continued  (Read 413481 times)
Jimmy
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« Reply #1650 on: August 31, 2015, 04:35:02 PM »

I finished reading Wheel of Time 9 this morning on the train to work. Still the typical pacing issues, which I'm used to by now, but it was an improvement over the previous book in the series. At least a few things happened in this book that have been building for a while!

Anyway, the library took a few weeks to get Wheel of Time 9, and so I requested book 10 a few days ago and it is already available. I'm going to go ahead and try to motor my way through book 10. It seems to be the series' lowest point, so it'll be good to have it under my belt.

After that I'll take another break from the series for a month or so. I'll finish reading Tales of the Elders of Ireland then, and read Njal's Saga before getting back to WoT.
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Yoda
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« Reply #1651 on: September 01, 2015, 12:05:17 AM »

Damn, you read that fast. What appeals to you about the WoT series? I read the first 3 books and after reading critiques of the rest of the series I decided to stop. Is there any character building besides the detailed history and description of the world? Is there any real threat or tension? I ask this because I looked up how the whole thing wraps up (I won't spoil) and it seems ...sooooo lame. Do people simply read WoT because they want to say they read a series that's more than 10k pages long? Do the characters become more interesting?



So I finished That Hideous Strength. I loved it. Pros: Arthurian legend, early scifi, insane conclusion, weird combination of fantasy and Christian mythology
Cons: SLLOW start, outdated beliefs on the role of women and married life.

I also finished At the Mountains of Madness: I didn't like it. So over-rated. The premise of the Old Ones, and the discovery that takes place is great. But incredibly dry description that proceeds on end, and non-existent characters make for a dull experience.


Started The Plague by Camus. I loved the Stranger, and this seems good.
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Tooker
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« Reply #1652 on: September 01, 2015, 12:13:57 AM »

If you got that far and it didn't grab you, it probably wouldn't if you kept going, either.

I liked the characters, and the world, and the whole overarching plot.  I feel like there is real threat - even the main characters don't really escape unscathed, although you can probably tell some of the folks who will definitely live to the end from book 1.  One of the criticisms I've made against the series (even as a fan) is that many of the characters really don't seem to grow much for a long time.  But they do grow in the end.

I've been keeping busy on the reading front as well - I went through the first three Dresden Files books in pretty short order, and I quite enjoyed them.

I'm now reading a book called The Lives of Tao, about an average guy who finds that an alien intelligence has taken up residence in his head and needs him to help save the world.  I'm not far into it, but I like the premise.
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Jimmy
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« Reply #1653 on: September 01, 2015, 10:46:39 AM »

I've kept reading them because I've found the world and its history to be pretty fascinating. I do wish there was more about the world's history than what there has been, but I'm pretty happy still without. It really is a vibrant world, and I really enjoy the distinctive countries, customs, and peoples throughout, and I enjoy when the characters visit a new area.

The magic system is also really well developed and interesting.

The characters aren't always likable, and Took's right that they develop, but very slowly, which can be really annoying at times. But what development is there is always good, and logical.

Really, I think the series' biggest shortcoming is the poor pacing. None of the books are paced well, and some of them seem downright glacial.

I'm just glad that, at this point, the "battle of the sexes" isn't so annoying. I was so sick of the "men are stupid" and "women are crazy" that permeated the earlier books.

EDIT: Oh, and yes, there is definitely threat and tension. In fact, there almost seems to be too much at times because not only is the world at stake, but there are plenty of evil and misguided characters following their own agendas that harry the main characters. I would actually like it more if the conflict focused on the big stuff, but I think Jordan's point was to show that the world is a big place full of people with lots of different opinions and motivations that drive them to do what they do and act how they act. A lot of the complexity revolves around bringing all these different people and societies together to face a universal threat.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2015, 10:53:06 AM by Jimmy » Logged
glassjawsh
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« Reply #1654 on: September 01, 2015, 11:13:07 AM »

This probably isn't a popular opinion but The Science of Discworld novels are better than any of the actual fantasy novels in the series.  I don't think I've ever read about a fantasy world in this level of detail.  It's basically like you're getting a condensed college education on the Discverse. (not just history, but math, logic, philosophy and physical and life sciences as well).  Writing these books had to have been a huge project and must have taken FOREVER (which is why Terry Pratchett cowrote them with a math professor and a biologist). 
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Dincrest
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« Reply #1655 on: September 01, 2015, 05:13:37 PM »

9/10s through The Way of Kings and things are going crazy (in a good way).  Anyone else reading this series?  It's pretty intense and after I finish this book, I'll need a breather before I start book 2 Words of Radiance.  

EDIT: I just read the most epic chapter of the book! 
Code:
Dalinar gives his Shardblade to Sadeas in exchange for all the bridgemen in Sadeas's camp.  Epic moment.  Then when Dalinar storms into King Elhokar's chamber he greets the king with a square kick to the chest.  I immediately shouted "Awww shiiiiiiit!  Things got fucking REAL now!"

« Last Edit: September 03, 2015, 09:30:40 PM by Dincrest » Logged

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