Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
August 28, 2014, 07:16:17 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
RPGFan Community Quiz
Next Quiz Date: January 11, 2014
Subject: 999 (Nintendo DS)
For more information click HERE!
329783 Posts in 13518 Topics by 2179 Members
Latest Member: Lian_Kazairl
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  RPGFan Message Boards
|-+  Media
| |-+  Single-Player RPGs
| | |-+  Revisiting FF7
« previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] 3 Print
Author Topic: Revisiting FF7  (Read 8781 times)
Druff
Posts: 29


Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2007, 03:09:40 AM »

to the best of my knowledge, barret's ebonics weren't present in the original version of the game and only added by the translators in the english script.

That's true. In the original Japanese script, Barret just "talked tough". He used the lowest level of politeness, in almost all situations, which is what virtually all "tough guy" type characters do in Japanese games and anime etc. You could take lines from the Japanese dialogue of Barret, Cid, Zell from FFVIII, Sabin from FFVI, Edge from FFIV, Waka from FFX, Samanosuke from Rurouni Kenshin, Bart from Xenogears and mix them all up and it'd be almost impossible to tell which lines went with which character, unless you knew their dialogue by heart. The ebonics was just another dumb idea from the translators at Sony. And for the record, tons of people have complained about it.

In a similar situation, Laguna in FFVIII comes off as a dumb airhead in the English version. In Japanese, he just sounds relaxed and informal, not stupid. Yet another misguided translation decision.
Logged
James8BitStar
Posts: 80


Member
*


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2007, 05:14:09 AM »

Quote from: "Professor Gast"
I don't see what is wrong about people playing RPGs mainly for the story.


Nothing's wrong with it, just that some people who prefer storylines over gameplay act like they're members of an elite club who alone know the "one true way" to enjoy an RPG.

No one at THIS forum has acted like that, I'm just sayin'...
Logged
Alisha
Posts: 2714


Member
*

Z0eila@hotmail.com Z0eila
View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #17 on: January 06, 2007, 07:41:08 AM »

im replaying this game and the amount of adult themed references is blowing my mind.
aeris seemed to be engaged in Enjo kosai(compensated dating) in exchange for clouds protection.

a brothel

that workout club type place is clearly full of gay guys.
kinda funny since i heard in one of the saga games square enix censored a lesbian characters lines.
Logged


“Normal is not something to aspire to, it's something to get away from.”
Parn
Posts: 2340


Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #18 on: January 06, 2007, 11:00:33 AM »

Quote from: "Professor Gast"
I don't see what is wrong about people playing RPGs mainly for the story. If you want to nitpick, try and translate a long RPG's script yourself in such a short period of time.

First statement is perfectly valid, the latter is not.  That's about as logical as someone getting upset that Star Ocean 2 keeps crashing, then piping in with "well, YOU program a game with multiple endings then and see if it never crashes!"  We're consumers.  Whether we can translate or program is completely irrelevant.  When we purchase a product, we're going in with the assumption that it's free of defects and will deliver what was advertised.  The consumer can complain and nitpick as much as he/she wants.

Quote
Yes, Final Fantasy Tactics, Final Fantasy VII, Xenogears and good deal of other early PlayStation RPGs suffered from translation issues, but did that make them significantly less enjoyable? I don't think so.

And I do think it makes them significantly less enjoyable.  It isn't purely translation issues, but also how the dialogue flows.  I am enjoying Final Fantasy XII because it has excellent writing and is doing a great job of delivering its story.  I thought Final Fantasy X was average at best because the dialogue was awful.  I thought Tales of Symphonia was an outstanding game because the dialogue was great and kept my attention (save the last three hours of standard Japanese cheesy "truth comes from the heart blah blah blah" end-of-game stuff).

Final Fantasy VII bored me to tears because the dialogue didn't do a thing for me.  People keep telling me that I should get past disc one to get to "all the good stuff", but I really doubt the writing magically transforms in quality on the remaining discs, so it sits alongside Final Fantasy Tactics and Star Ocean 2, collecting dust.  Perhaps I'll give the games another chance someday, but in the meantime, there are plenty of other games to play that don't suffer from poor writing.
Logged
Dios GX
Banninated
Posts: 892

Member
*

dios@hidoshi.com GSaviourPrime
View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #19 on: January 06, 2007, 04:18:28 PM »

To tack on to Parn's statement, it isn't just the bland writing/dialogue in itself. It's the fact that very shallow writing makes characters pathetically static and uninteresting.

I personally found FF6 to be probably the worst FF game I've ever played. The gameplay is good stuff, but the dialogue is so vanilla I got too bored to finish the game.

As such, it isn't just a poor translation job in itself that ruins games and gives us more than enough right to complain; it's also when the dialogue is boring even if it's in perfect English structure.

Heil mein Atlus.
Logged
James8BitStar
Posts: 80


Member
*


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2007, 05:12:04 PM »

Okay, I have now finished Disc 1 of Final Fantasy VII.  As I was playing, I wrote down my thoughts and feelings at irregular intervals, basically so I would remember how I really felt overall instead of judging the entire disc by its absolute best and worst moments (as I usually do).

Overall Thoughts
So far, my re-experiencing FF7 was a mixed reunion.  At times, I thought "This game isn't so bad."  At other times, the game bored me, and at still others it annoyed me to the point where I wanted to unhook my Playstation and go back to playing NES games.  For the most part, the bad outweighed the good, but I'm still determined to play this game through to the end.

The Storyline
Of course I won't be able to deliver a complete critique until I've beaten the game, but still there are some observations I can make from material covered here.

First of all, Disc 1 suffers much from artificial length extension, where the writers add a bunch of filler just to extend the length of the game so they can advertise that its "a story so epic it takes X hours to complete!"  Now, the pacing of the plot was all well and good when you were in Midgar and it picks up again near the end of the disc, but inbetween the good parts you get basically a group of seven (nine if you find Yuffie and Vincent) people who chase a black-caped man from town to town with very little actual plot advancement.  It stretches five hours of plot over twenty hours, basically.

Now, generally I don't believe you should judge a story by what general traits you recognize but rather by particulars--you don't judge a portrait by its frame--but as a whole, Final Fantasy VII's story strikes me as simply "standard," there's nothing particularly bad about it, but there's nothing that stands out, either.

Except maybe one thing:  Aeris' death.  In the years since I first played this, I had forgotten what a good bit this was--especially considering its probably the most acknowledged and discussed part of the entire game, the one part of the story that everyone knows even if they've never played the game before, so its easy to make a retrospective analysis that dismisses this scene as a cheap ploy for emotion.  But watching it again, it actually works.  And not because of the FMV, and not because of anything involving Aeris' character, and only slightly because of the music.  No, what makes it work is the dialogue between Cloud and Sephiroth, and in particular what Cloud actually says.  I mean, I have never seen a death of a major character done with this much honesty.  I mean usually when a major character dies all that happens is everyone says they were a good friend, Cloud talks about all the things Aeris is never going to do again, says his throat's getting dry... and actually interrupts a Sephiroth monologue.  This is just good, right here.  GOOD.

Now that I think about it, the beginning segments in Midgar are also really good, probably because they don't suffer from pacing problems--a story is definitely being told here, a compelling one at that.  In fact in retrospect,  the time spent in Midgar almost seems like a totally different game.  Easily Shinra was a better villainous figure than Sephiroth--I mean, these were guys who were so determined to crush all resistance that they flattened an entire Midgar sector just to get at a group of five or six people.

Once you're out of Midgar though, the game's plot takes a sudden shift and so do things like Shinra.  Now that Sephiroth is the big baddie, Shinra is relegated to the background and basically jump the shark, being represented by little more than common threads in everyone's backstories and occasional appearances by the Turks, who are a rather questionable group of "professional" covert agents... "professionals" who do everything from develop crushes on the good guys to worrying about stepping on flowers while failing time and again to capture an overall average young woman.  Then again, Shinra is the same company which had a top-ranking scientist that thought he could continue the bloodline of the Ancients by making Aeris mate with a dog, so I guess I shouldn't trust too much in Shinra's competency.

Probably the one thing that really hurts the story for me though, is when Sephiroth's plan is finally revealed:  To call down a meteor then absorb the life energy of the planet to become a god.  Just reading that bit suddenly made me feel like I was watching a cartoon instead of playing an RPG, and
destroyed Sephiroth's character in the process.  I mean before that, Seph
was kind of this mysterious character of questionable mentality, but once
you read that he's just another madman.

The Music
Now is it just me, or does some of the music sound like revised versions of music from Final Fantasy Six?  I can't remember all the familiar songs I heard, but I know I heard one that sounded a lot like the FF6 Opera House song, several times.  Ironically I found the "recycled" music to generally be the better set of tunes--the songs unique to this game came off, like the plot, as "standard."

Play Control and Graphics
Now, normally I don't comment on play control in RPGs, but I did have some problems here.  Simply put, I wish this game had Analog Joystick support (I know this game was invented before the Dual Shock but still, a man can wish), as some parts were a pain to navigate with the digital pad and I had trouble getting Cloud to face some people so I could talk to them.

I also really hate Square's "cinematic" camera angles that channel the spirit of Alone in the Dark and Resident Evil.  These have a hand in some of my control problems, but also are just really impractical.  I can't always make out features that I need to be able to discern because an object is too far away or shown at an angle where its unclear what it is--an example of this is the bell in Wutai--I had to actually look at a FAQ because I didn't even know what that thing was, much less that I was supposed to ring it (and even after looking at the FAQ, the bell was surrounded by so much visual clutter that I had to go into the gazebo housing it and keep pressing the circle button until something happened).  Frankly, I don't see why every area couldn't have been three-dimensional like the overworld.

Materia
I'm gonna say upfront:  I am not a fan of systems that allow you to customize your character however you want.  I mean, I like the idea of it, I just have yet to see a game that pulls it off right, whether it be PC or Console, new or old.

In FF7's case, there's quite a few reason Materia is not good customization.  One reason that I found early on was that there simply is not a very steep penalty for loading a character down with Spellcasting Materia--I actually experimented with Cloud, fighting enemies both with and without Materia, and the only difference was that he did 50 HP more damage without Materia.  That's not exactly a compelling reason to avoid allowing him to throw fire, heal wounds, and summon dieties.

Another was a lack of variety in the Materia.  Simply put, its too easy to get your hands on Materia that allows you to cast spells, but not easy enough to get your hands on Materia that improves your strength or speed and gives you a special ability.

Let's suppose, for example, that I wanted to make Barret a character who has strong physical attacks but can't use magic.  Woops, sorry... there's no store on the first disc where you can buy attribute-enhancing materia, except for HP Plus which can be bought in Cosmo Canyon.  Barret would simply not have enough extra power in his punch to provide a compelling reason to deprive him of universally-useful attack and healing spells.  Perhaps if there were stores where I could buy attribute-enhancing Materia I'd be more inclined to modify him.  I'm imagining that on disc two maybe such a store appears, but by that point... why bother?  The bonus wouldn't be sufficient to handle the latest challenges unless I went out of my way to level up the Materia.

What it comes down to is, Materia was actually a good system, just Square flubbed it.  All that they would have to do to fix it is make a wider variety of Materia available early on (and don't tell me that this would unbalance the game because, as pointed out, Materia starts out weak and levels up over time just like your characters, so that would balance it out).  As it is though, basically all you can really do with the Materia system is make sure everyone has healing spells and equip whatever spells are most useful for the given circumstances.

The Gameplay
This is where most of my problems are.  Everything that irritated me about the game, major or minor, was specifically related to the gameplay.

And by "Gameplay" I mean "Battles."

Now, I hate complaining about this, because complaining about battles gives fanboys cause to complain that "you just hate it cuz you suck at it," but understand that I have beaten the first disc, including the Wutai subquest and finding Vincent, so don't dare think I'm just ranting about "challenges" I couldn't overcome.

Anyway, deal is the game eventually gets to a point where random encounter monsters have the most totally annoying gimmicks, which they use again and again.  Often battles become more tedious and frustrating than challenging and fun.  The downhill trend starts in that cave in Cosmo Canyon, where every enemy can start you on an instant-death countdown, forcing you to use spells like Fire2 which are real MP-suckers, just to get the battle over in time.  Then Shinra Mansion hits you with little pumpkinhead ghosts who start every battle by casting mute spells on you (so you have to beat them down, which is kinda tedious and slow) and has some strange two-headed thing who is barely hurt at all by physical attacks.  Okay, I know I sound like I'm tripping over myself here--on one hand I'm saying I want to be able to preserve my magic, on the other hand I'm saying I like to be able to use it if the battles are getting too tedious.  But hey, a guy is allowed to have options, especially regarding a limited resource which may very well become a commodity--you never know when a boss is about to appear unless you read a walkthru.

But probably the worst offender of the "annoying battle tactics" category was these grasshopper-like things you face on Mt. Nibel.  They do a move called "Lay Down" which does 200 HP per hit (mind you, this is with the best armor, though all my characters were front-row so that may have been part of the issue).  That wouldn't mean a damn thing, except that these things come in groups of five and all five seem to get to move before your guys can pull off an attack.  I mean, in one battle, Barret went in with a full Limit Break gauge and, first thing, I commanded him to use his hand grenade limit break (damages all enemies).  I did this right at the beginning of the battle, but the grasshopper things got to move first, and whats more all of them got to go twice before Barret ever got a chance to launch his attack--and by the time it was finally my guys' turn, Barret was dead.  I've beaten a few groups of these grasshopper things, but it seemed like I could never finish one without one or two of my characters being either dead or in the yellow.

This kind of thing is, again, not fun or challenging in the "right" way, its just totally annoying for the player.  I mean seriously, you know all those monsters in older RPGs who did nothing but heal each other and call for help causing battles to drag on endlessly?  I would gladly face those guys a hundred times instead of ever putting up with those darn grasshoppers again!

Well, thats all for my thoughts on Disc 1.  I think I'll take a short break from playing the game, and then decide when exactly I'll post my thoughts next (should I go with a "end of each disc" pattern or just hold off until I beat the game, since the third disc is so short?)
Logged
Akanbe-
Posts: 2753


Cheap? I paid a lot for this hat!

Member
*

----- 4237981
View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2007, 05:54:57 PM »

Quote from: "Parn"
Final Fantasy VII bored me to tears because the dialogue didn't do a thing for me.  People keep telling me that I should get past disc one to get to "all the good stuff", but I really doubt the writing magically transforms in quality on the remaining discs, so it sits alongside Final Fantasy Tactics and Star Ocean 2, collecting dust.  Perhaps I'll give the games another chance someday, but in the meantime, there are plenty of other games to play that don't suffer from poor writing.


When I first read your post I thought you were just being picky (although the complaint is justified).

Then I took a moment and actually tried to remember Star Ocean 2's writing and I fully agree with you.  It was just too... lame for a better word.  There were a million "Claude/Rena......" lines and just general weirdness for a lack of a better word.
Logged


"Karma is...secret top tier"~Starmongoose
PSN ID: Akanbe9
Dios GX
Banninated
Posts: 892

Member
*

dios@hidoshi.com GSaviourPrime
View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2007, 07:24:03 PM »

it's totally animu yo.

"Claude...."
"Rena....."
*SEX SCENE*
"THAT WAS GOOD BABY"
"Yes it was, mmmmmmm."
"Oh Claude......"
"mmm, rena...."

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
Logged
Akanbe-
Posts: 2753


Cheap? I paid a lot for this hat!

Member
*

----- 4237981
View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #23 on: January 06, 2007, 07:51:52 PM »

You forgot the:

<Rena> I'm coming!
<Dias> 10 seconds.
Logged


"Karma is...secret top tier"~Starmongoose
PSN ID: Akanbe9
MeshGearFox
Posts: 8449


HERE ON RUM ISLAND WE DO NOT BELIEVE IN RUM!

Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #24 on: January 06, 2007, 09:16:12 PM »

James: You raise some interesting points about the battle system. While I sort of agree with you, I have my own take on some of the problems.

You mention the enemies having gimmicks. This isn't a problem in and of itself. However, what is a problem is that Death ALWAYS works against you, and never works against them. Expand this to include generally every interesting spell like poison and stat droppers. As far as I know, FFX was the first FF to actually make it sort of meaningful to try to beat your enemies in creative ways, although in that case there was usually only one creative way and it was mostly just trial and error to figure it out.

This is generally why I prefer the Megaten and SaGa games in many instances. In said games, you can get positively raped relatively quickly. At the same time, you can also completely !@#% up the enemies just as much, if not more. Nocturne, for instance, is the first game I remember playing where stat dropping bosses was actually meaningful, and I also found various other amusing ways to just generally cause some of the bosses to break.

As for materia, uh... Yeah, everyone could be a jack of all trades, and there weren't nearly enough interesting materia. I don't know what would've been better. I'll think about it a bit. I have some other thoughts on this that go outside the scope of the post.

Also, WTF? Rena really doesn't last long.
Logged

o/` I do not feel joy o/`
o/` I do not dream o/`
o/` I only stare at the door and smoke o/`

James8BitStar
Posts: 80


Member
*


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #25 on: January 07, 2007, 02:40:47 AM »

Quote from: "MeshGearFox"
You mention the enemies having gimmicks. This isn't a problem in and of itself. However, what is a problem is that Death ALWAYS works against you, and never works against them.


Not necessarily.  In fact one of the funnest battles I had was when I successfully managed to have Cait Sith manipulate one of the Gi Tribe ghosts and make it put a death curse on itself.  Then I left the game running while I went to make food.  when I came back, I had won ^__^.

On the flip side of the "gimmicky enemies" thing, I often found that bosses would seem hard at first but it would then turn out that there's a very easy way to beat them.  I'm specifically thinking of Lost Number, Rapps, and that thing you face after Sephiroth kills Aeris.

Quote
Expand this to include generally every interesting spell like poison and stat droppers. As far as I know, FFX was the first FF to actually make it sort of meaningful to try to beat your enemies in creative ways, although in that case there was usually only one creative way and it was mostly just trial and error to figure it out.


Well, in FF1 once I got the Mage Staff (I think that's what it was called) I used its ability (free casting of Confuse) every battle to make enemies fight each other... but since that basically became a formula I'm not sure that really counts as "creative."

However, I actually did find that some special abilities and spells would work on enemies.  In fact I found, several times, that Aeris' "Seal Evil" technique was a lifesaver because it paralyzes enemies--even bosses.  This Limit Break was a large part of why I was able to defeat Lost Number.

I have Star Ocean 2... its one of those games I've had for awhile but never really got around to playing.  Guess I'll have to do that.
Logged
MeshGearFox
Posts: 8449


HERE ON RUM ISLAND WE DO NOT BELIEVE IN RUM!

Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #26 on: January 07, 2007, 03:49:31 AM »

Limit Breaks don't really count as normal magical attacks though.

Actually, spirit breaks are sort of interesting. What they are is basically an evolution of the unique character skills from FFVI, which were themselves an evolution of the ones from FFIV.

Always felt it was a bit cheap to constantly spam, well, blitzes and stuff, which is ultimately what you ended up doing when you played as Sabin. Square, I guess, must've felt the same way, which is why they relegated them to limit breaks. I guess this is more apparent in FFVIII and FFX where the limit breaks are a bit more analogous to some of the FFVI skills, although FFX had certain built in proficiencies making the characters even more unique (and I'll also note that I liked FFX's limit break system the most,  'cause you could get the limit breaks in different ways). Anyway, in this case, you could basically swap around materia and junctions relatively freely, making characters incredibly similar in this sense. FFVIII had certain junctions alter how you level up, but nothing major. FFV obviously used job change to make characters unique (or, rather, you could easily give characters all the same skills, as per Digital Devil Saga, but at the same time, you'd have them not all equip the same stuff at once, otherwise your party would break). FFIX is sort of a modified version of the job system I guess. Heavily modified. Skills come from weapons. Only certain chars get certain weapons. Ergo, certain skills are unique to certain characters.

So, yeah. Basically, there are two main paradigms for character advancement in the SNES-PSX-PSX branch of FF games. Magical Fun Things you can swap around, and systems that actually cause permanent changes to the character. There's a little overlap, I guess, but not much. And FFV is the only one where the characters are not inherently unique in any way. Also, I'm not counting FFXI because I *really* don't care about it.

Materia and junctions have been discussed to death, this topic and elsewhere, and will probably be better discussed by other people than me.

Right. Sphere grid had some issues, given that it was too easy to max out. Individual character paths weren't that big, cept for like Yuna and Lulu. Khimari... did he even have a unique path? the other issue was the linearity of it. If your characters, on their unique paths, are generally just going to linearly gain their stat ups and new skills... why even bother?

I was worried the license board would have the the same problem, but so far it looks good. To an extent, you can have everyone have similar skills. Beyond basics like Cure and Libra, though, you DO have to specialize, otherwise stuff starts go get weird. Basically, the license board looks like a  modified form of that that 9-hex thing from unlimited saga, only instead of every license slot directly affecting your stats, it's done indirectly through allowing you different kinds of armor to equip with different bonuses. While I think tying in the stat ups directly to the weapon/armor/skill licenses could've introduced another strategic element to character development, the way it works now basically accomplishes the same thing, and makes armor a LOT more interesting in this game than in, say, FFX, where I never honestly understood how the weapon skill system was supposed to work. I remember it being vaguely like the one in unlimited saga, in the sense that you have a weapon, and glue a bunch of random crap (eyeballs, metal, bits of cheese, bombs) to it to add powers and put new skills on it, only I also recall the requirements for the more interesting skills having rather stupidly high requirements, and instead of going to a blacksmith shop or refining at save points, it... involved one of Yuna's summons (or it got unlocked around the time you got one of them) and you got it sort of later in the game? Towards the midpoint?

Oh, another comment on story real quick! Looking back, because I've been considering replaying FFX, I think it had a lot of the same juvenilish issues FFVII did. I mean, not the homophobia or racism or feeling like a fanfic written by a 14 year old faux badass. I mean more like the cheesy dialogue, the lameness of pretty much the entire cast except uh Auron and Lulu, and the way that it felt like it was written by a 14 year old animu-fangirl. Also, the vague religiousy preachyness didn't help much. While FFIX had a sort of wistful, childlike fantasticalness to it, it never felt *childish*, and where FFVIII had teen melodrama and angst, that was mostly done to fit in with the whole teenagers-going-into-the-real-world thing (see: Persona). There's a difference between not being in control of the story and being in control of it. The weird bits of comedic relief, most of the angst, the "lighter" atmosphere of FFIV and FFV -- that was all done intentionally, and in total control. I'm not talking plot points here. That's another can of worms. Mostly just dialogue and tone. And that's, specifically, where I felt that FFX sort of dropped the ball in ways similar to FFVII. I can't really identify why, in either. I can see the effects and come up with sort of examples. Again, just a lot of small things that make it feel really off to me.

---edit---

For the record, I'm neither pretentious or this verbose on purpose. It's a conditioned response to that goddamn nanowrimo thing and essays. Some perverse form of the Tetris effect. Also when you type at like 80-100 WPM and can just spit out stuff off the top of your head, it's quicker to write this stuff than read it :|

Damn :(
Logged

o/` I do not feel joy o/`
o/` I do not dream o/`
o/` I only stare at the door and smoke o/`

James8BitStar
Posts: 80


Member
*


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #27 on: January 07, 2007, 06:17:19 AM »

Quote from: "MeshGearFox"
---edit---

For the record, I'm neither pretentious or this verbose on purpose. It's a conditioned response to that goddamn nanowrimo thing and essays. Some perverse form of the Tetris effect.


I don't mind, you say some interesting things... even though I don't understand half of it because I have little experience with most of the games you mention.  Mostly because I started getting bored with RPGs around the time of the Playstation--in fact the only ones I went through the trouble to beat even once were King's Field and FF7 (and King's Field was the one I wanted to play again afterwards).

I probably just need more RPGs that aren't by Square, who I tend to feel is merely the middle line of RPG quality.

Quote
Also when you type at like 80-100 WPM and can just spit out stuff off the top of your head, it's quicker to write this stuff than read it :|

Damn :(


For some reason that just makes me want to sing the theme song to Hong Kong Phooey.
Logged
Dice
Super Happy Fun Super Girl
AMG A GIRL
Posts: 10290


Tawdry Hepburn

Member
*


View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #28 on: January 08, 2007, 04:51:16 PM »

I'll never forget Wild Arms II's hack dialogue which made me have to reread a ton of lines (for the life of me, I couldnt tell you the storyline in the game).

SO2 was a game I LOVED TO DEATH but the dialogue dragged on and on AND ON.  As already pointed out, there are numerous "<Name>..." lines or "Nevermind...".  (It doesnt help that the ellipses comes up as a bubble over their heads once every ten seconds).  AND FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, WHAT 19 YEAR OLD BOY SAYS "How exasperating!!".

Actually, speaking of hack jobs.  I dont care how immature this makes me, but the Dejap version of Tales of Phantasia cracks me up.  Go them!
Logged

http://society6.com/Dice963
Support your local Dice (and pitch her ideas)!
blackthirteen
Posts: 294

Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #29 on: January 08, 2007, 06:39:08 PM »

Unlike many people I liked FF7's writing and storyline very much. And now all of you gave me a sudden urge to replay the game :D

FF7 rules! :D
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!