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Author Topic: How many PC RPG Fans are there?  (Read 8262 times)
James8BitStar
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« on: January 24, 2007, 01:24:18 AM »

It just seems to me that when it comes to RPGs, consoles seem to get the brunt of the fanbase, while PCs are mostly niche.

Though I own and have played more console RPGs, I've felt that PC RPGs are the superior form, though admittedly also the more complicated at times.

What you think?
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Silverwolf X
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« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2007, 05:41:27 AM »

Depends on what part of this Planet you're planted in...

I've got a ridiculous amount of Japanese, Korean and Chinese RPGs piling up, I haven't even gone into the other genres yet.
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James8BitStar
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« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2007, 06:44:08 AM »

Quote from: "Silverwolf X"
Depends on what part of this Planet you're planted in...


All right.  My original post was comparing American-made PC RPGs to Japanese-made Console RPGs.

What are PC RPGs like in Japan, China, and Korea anyway?
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Silverwolf X
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« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2007, 07:07:22 AM »

Well, glad ya ask:

Japanese:
Fantasy mainly with player in 3rd persepective controlling prenamed characters. Art style tend to use anime/manga styles. Quite a large number use 2D sprites on semi-3D backgrounds. Average number go fully 3D. Tend to use their country's folklore and myths in themes at an average rate. Not afraid to have extremely sensitive themes like religion and demon worship in story.

Chinese:
They have a habit of using their country's history and folklore ALOT. Mainly story in games tend to centre around bravery, sacrifice, war, loyalty and love. There are several purely fantasy ones mimicing the Japanese style, an example would be Heroine Anthem.

Korean:
Have to admit, these people love going online, alot of MMORPGs, equal distribution of 2D and 3D styled games. Game stories tend to involve martial arts themes alot. The stories in korean games are forgettable though. their greatest export to the world so far? Ragnarok Online. A game you'd love to hate, but play anyway.
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James8BitStar
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« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2007, 07:33:50 AM »

Japan's PC RPGs sound no different from their Console RPGs.

If I knew Chinese I'd like to play some of those, especially if there happens to be any decent ones based on Journey to the West (yes I know Koei made a Strategy/RPG of that for the Playstation... I have it... but I imagine the source country for the legend could do it better).
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Dincrest
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« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2007, 08:44:17 AM »

Even among the realm of US PC RPGs, there's a world of difference.  Neverwinter Nights is nothing like Vampire The Masquerade: Bloodlines which is nothing like Elder Scrolls.  

I like that many PC RPGs allow you to manipulate situations your way (i.e. if a door is locked I don't have to look for the key; I can blast it with a magic spell or something.)  However, I'm not fond of the constant clicky-clicky-clicky combat in many genre examples.  I do not find that fun.  

However, I loved games like Deus Ex and especially System Shock 2 which had more of an FPS element.  Combat and everything in those games is really fun.  I'm definitely excited about Hellgate London (though I kinda doubt my computer will be able to run it.)  Sidenote:  Even the introductory level in the System Shock 2 demo (after the training) scared the shit out of me.  

A few PC RPGs have attempted to be more like their console brethren like Septerra Core and Anachronox.  I've never played Anachronox but I've played Septerra Core.  I really wanted to love Septerra Core, but I ultimately found it boring.
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Silverwolf X
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« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2007, 01:36:55 PM »

Quote from: "James8BitStar"
Japan's PC RPGs sound no different from their Console RPGs.

If I knew Chinese I'd like to play some of those, especially if there happens to be any decent ones based on Journey to the West (yes I know Koei made a Strategy/RPG of that for the Playstation... I have it... but I imagine the source country for the legend could do it better).


Saiyuki as the Japanese call it and Journey To The West as the english literate call it, did not originate from Japan, but from China. Same for Suikoden, which is the Water Margin.

The Japanese use Chinese legends in their games as well.

As for you question, I don't remember of any PC game that took direct references from Saiyuki... well there is this hentai game in the late 90s.... -.-;;
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James8BitStar
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« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2007, 05:32:43 PM »

Quote from: "Silverwolf X"
As for you question, I don't remember of any PC game that took direct references from Saiyuki... well there is this hentai game in the late 90s.... -.-;;


Uhhh.... how exactly do you make a hentai game based on Saiyuki?

(Do I want to know?)

@ Dincrest

You pretty much summarized some of why I'm starting to prefer PC RPGs.  The freedom, the exploration... and funnily enough, to some extent the storylines.  I love that the best ones actually take game logic into account instead of just "This is how it played out for the sake of the plot."  Like when your mentor confronts the villain at the beginning of Baldur's Gate.
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« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2007, 06:07:25 PM »

I love me some PC RPGs.

Baldur's Gate 2?  Sunk way too much time into that shit.  Only played through it once, and all because I know that if I ever started a new game, I'd never stop for months.

Planescape:  Torment?  If there's a finer character-driven RPG out there, I have yet to see it.

Fallout and its sequel?  I'd go so far as to call them flawless.

Morrowind?  Hundreds of hours put into it.  It and Diablo 2 are the only games that have stayed on my computer from the moment they were purchased, because I could (and do) feel the urge to play them at any time.

The thing is, my computer's starting to get a little obsolete, so I can't play anything recent.  I've got a copy of Oblivion right here beside me just waiting for me to get a decent video card.
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Serene Prophet
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« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2007, 09:54:07 PM »

I love PC RPG's, and im sad there arnt a more steady supply of them.  I cant read any other language but English, so importing titles is out of the question.  I just hope folks like Bioware, Obsidian, etc, continue to make epic adventures.  

And I agree, I hate the clicky click click of games like diablo...ugh..diablo..*barf*
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James8BitStar
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« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2007, 01:55:41 AM »

Quote from: "The Darkrider"
The thing is, my computer's starting to get a little obsolete, so I can't play anything recent.  I've got a copy of Oblivion right here beside me just waiting for me to get a decent video card.


The comp I use for most of my gaming is a 500 MHz machine still running Win98 First Edition (though I usually just boot into DOS).

You at least can play Morrowind.  Personally I've thought about getting a new comp just for Morrowind and Oblivion.

As it happens, I've been playing Daggerfall (predecessor to Morrowind) again.
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Ryos
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« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2007, 02:26:33 AM »

I think my biggest problem with PC RPGs in general is that they're often so focused on trying to give as many options as possible that they fail to make a central narrative compelling enough for me to latch on.  Two of my favorite PC RPGs are noteworthy simply because they DO have one - namely Planescape: Torment and Anachronox (although the latter is more of a traditional Japanese title in terms of its mold than a typical PC RPG, but I digress).
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Dincrest
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« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2007, 09:29:57 AM »

I still haven't played Planetscape: Torment and that's one game that's almost constantly recommended to me.
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MeshGearFox
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« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2007, 05:09:41 PM »

Hrm. I didn't like Planescape. Writing was way overdone, there was too much of it, and, uh, it seriously sounded like everyone in the entire world was making it with the ghost of Lermontov.

Daggerfall... Cute game. Lots of fun details. Not much game, though. You have this hyper-detailed character creation system, a rather intricate alliance/allegiance/alignment system, and then the rest of the game involves taking incredibly repetitive,"random" missions, all broken, uninteresting, or unrewarding, through rather long and identical looking dungeons. There's absolutely no reason to play it for more than ten hours because nothing ever happens. You just get stronger and so does everyone else.

I didn't like Fallout 2. Too much in common with Fallout 1, and I can't say they really improved anything. The writing seemed... worse, and the dungeons less interesting. Maybe I just got the wrong impression because I started playing it within minutes of finishing Fallout 1. Fallout 1 I totally adore though ^_______________^

Anyway, Albion's good. Nobody mentions Albion ever.

And what about Wizardry 8? I was playing that last night. That's gotta be one of the best RPGs I've played, period.
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James8BitStar
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« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2007, 02:51:52 AM »

While I love your insights, MeshGearFox, I heavily disagree with that about Daggerfall.  So far, its been the most addictive RPG I've played in ten years--even down to the dungeons.

Yes they're repetitive and sometimes it gets irritating (I just got past an area where I had to find a note detailing the death of someone's brother, and found out I had actually found the right room but missed it because it was behind an obstacle that I didn't know I could get over), but I think what saves Daggerfall for me is just the freedom.  I'm not talking about being able to kill people and ignore the main quest (though I do like that the options are there), but rather the little freedoms--like if you can't pick a door's lock, you can cast a spell on it or beat it down or (and this was unintentional but still) use the void, and how you can create a spell and fly around ("I can't figure out how I'm supposed to get up there... no worries!") or climb virtually any surface.  In fact when in towns I've gotten into the habit of travelling by rooftop-jumping like a Ranma 1/2 character.

It's not just that those freedoms are there though (and what I'm about to say goes for most PC RPGs), but rather that they make me feel like I'm part of the world--I'm in the story because I choose to be, not because the game won't let me do anything else.

Ryos mentioned "compelling narratives."  While PC RPGs tend to be more minimalist (no "save points are evil and God is actually a dilapitated space zombie who created humans as a power source" stuff) I find I'm more compelled by their plots, simply for (as I said) that I feel like I'm actually a part of it.  The feel of going into taverns, hoping to get a random tip-off, or being told a rumor and having to use your own devices to verify it, is far different from the feeling I get when I reach a town and get a cutscene.

Yeah, I've rambled.

And I'll add Albion to my "games to check out" list.
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