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Author Topic: Book Thread Continued  (Read 293212 times)
Lard
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« Reply #840 on: February 16, 2011, 11:12:10 PM »

My copies of Vampire Hunter D 14 & 15 as well as Yashakiden Vol. 3 arrived. Just waiting for Yashakiden Vol. 2, so I can read through all three books during reading week.
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Starmongoose
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« Reply #841 on: February 19, 2011, 10:23:41 AM »

Just got a big, gorgeous complete Sherlock Holmes book. Cost a pretty penny, but I just couldn't resist.

Also picked up all the books in a Song of Ice and Fire
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Esper_Crusader
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« Reply #842 on: February 19, 2011, 10:51:18 PM »

Terry Brooks - The first king of Shannara.  I'm suprised at how I've overlooked these for so long.  I'm pretty much going through all his works right now and I'm enjoying them quite a bit. When I'm done with those I think I might get into The Wheel of Time books too.  I've heard good things..plus I'm running out of options.
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Azrael
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« Reply #843 on: February 20, 2011, 01:19:18 AM »

So the Borders near my house is one of the Borders being closed due to their recent bankruptcy and they are in the process of clearing stock. Honestly, the deals weren't as good as they might get to (20-40% off, but basically all fiction books are only 20% off) but I went to check it out and see if I could get something cheap. The place was MOBBED. Seriously the line to check out was probably an hour wait. The place was just so crazy. I didn't think it was worth the wait for $2-3 off a book, but I guess everyone else did. I'm going to go in sometime later when the discounts get better and hope that there's still a copy of one of the books I want to get. I was looking at either Joyce's Ulysses, Kerouac and Burroughs's And the Hippos Were Boiled in their Tanks, or Bolano's Monsieur Pain.

As for what I'm actually reading...

Mostly some short stories from Cesare Pavese. He was certainly an interesting writer.
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Yoda
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« Reply #844 on: February 20, 2011, 05:12:40 AM »

Just got a big, gorgeous complete Sherlock Holmes book. Cost a pretty penny, but I just couldn't resist.

Also picked up all the books in a Song of Ice and Fire


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Vanguard
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« Reply #845 on: February 20, 2011, 07:04:32 PM »

So the Borders near my house is one of the Borders being closed due to their recent bankruptcy and they are in the process of clearing stock. Honestly, the deals weren't as good as they might get to (20-40% off, but basically all fiction books are only 20% off) but I went to check it out and see if I could get something cheap. The place was MOBBED. Seriously the line to check out was probably an hour wait. The place was just so crazy. I didn't think it was worth the wait for $2-3 off a book, but I guess everyone else did. I'm going to go in sometime later when the discounts get better and hope that there's still a copy of one of the books I want to get. I was looking at either Joyce's Ulysses, Kerouac and Burroughs's And the Hippos Were Boiled in their Tanks, or Bolano's Monsieur Pain.

As for what I'm actually reading...

Mostly some short stories from Cesare Pavese. He was certainly an interesting writer.

Having read Ulysses, let me give you some advice. This is a book that lends itself to a class. Also, it's really not worth it unless you want to see someone experimenting with language and narrative. Don't get me wrong, it's incredible. One of my favorite reading experiences ever, but it's not something you just casually crack open.

If you do get it, go for the Gabbler edition. The Penguin one isn't as textually accurate, I believe.
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Hidoshi: Walt Whitman could beat you with both dicks tied behind his back.
Yoda
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« Reply #846 on: February 20, 2011, 07:29:04 PM »

I've heard reading Ulysses is quite the chore.




Reading "It" is taking longer than usual, I didn't read that much this past week. Story is still amazing though.
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Vanguard
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« Reply #847 on: February 20, 2011, 09:27:01 PM »

I just typed up a long response and the internet ate it. So, here's the abridged version:

Ulysses is the type of book that you get out what you put into it. My personal favorite is chapter 11, when Harold Bloom is sitting at a bar with the knowledge that his wife is home fucking some other guy. Another good one is chapter 15, when Bloom, drunk on absinthe, hallucinates that he's being tried for lechery by the prostitutes in Dublin's red light district.
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Thoren: Astronomers fucking love stars and shit. Whitman was a bitch.
Hidoshi: Walt Whitman could beat you with both dicks tied behind his back.
Azrael
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« Reply #848 on: February 20, 2011, 10:26:53 PM »

I am a huge fan of Joyce and have read and loved Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist. I've been meaning to read Ulysses for some time now. I know full well what I'm getting myself into and fully intend to pick it up when I'm prepared to really pour myself into the work. The only Joyce work I don't want to touch is Finnegan's Wake.
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Vanguard
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« Reply #849 on: February 20, 2011, 11:23:53 PM »

Ulysses is the only Joyce I've read.

Finnegan's Wake is interesting for a few reasons. At the time Joyce was writing it, he was nearly blind. To deal with this, he enlisted someone to take his dictation. That person was Samuel Beckett, one of my three favorite writers (the others being John Ashbery and Gertrude Stein).

Some speculate that FW is Joyce's attempt to understand schizophrenia, a condition his daughter suffered from. During the time he wrote it, she was a patient of Carl Jung. There's a quote attributed to Jung that goes something like this, "Two people are headed toward the bottom of a river. One is falling, the other is diving."

Still, I doubt I'll ever read it either. My goal is to try Ezra Pound's The Cantos this year. I'll probably fail.

« Last Edit: February 20, 2011, 11:36:48 PM by Vanguard » Logged

Thoren: Astronomers fucking love stars and shit. Whitman was a bitch.
Hidoshi: Walt Whitman could beat you with both dicks tied behind his back.
Azrael
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« Reply #850 on: February 21, 2011, 01:53:11 AM »

I highly recommend Portrait of the Artist. Not nearly as long as Ulysses and probably a lot more accessible.

I also thought that it was his wife that had helped him in writing Finnegan's Wake. Never knew Beckett was involved.
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Starmongoose
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« Reply #851 on: March 07, 2011, 03:08:15 PM »

I picked up the entire Song of Ice and Fire series whilst I was in Glasgow a few weeks ago, I had already read A Game of Thrones about a year before though when I checked it out of the library. I liked the book a lot, but it didn't make me crave the next book immediately after. I guess subconsciously I've been wanting to read the rest.

So, I am just about to sit down and read A Clash of Kings.
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Dade
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« Reply #852 on: March 24, 2011, 12:27:46 AM »

Evelyn bought me a Kindle for a late anniversary present. Just tore through The Gathering Storm (Book 12 of the Wheel of Time) in about a week, about 1/4 of the way through Towers of Midnight (man, Brandon Sanderson is REALLY great) and once I'm done I plan on hopping into The Name of the Wind and give that a re-read so I can be fresh for The Wise Man's Fear.

Once I've finished that, it's time for a Song of Ice and Fire reread in preparation for A Dance with Dragons, and then by the time THAT is out and read, I should be able to reread The Way of Kings (if you havent read, it's a fucking massive tome of awesome) so Sanderson's new book can be released. And if his next book isn't out, I can actually read the Mistborn series.

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Azrael
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« Reply #853 on: March 24, 2011, 07:30:07 AM »

It's funny that now that I'm working everyday and have less time on my hands than before, I'm reading more than I did as a bum sitting at home all day. Most recent reads:

By Night in Chile by Roberto Bolano - It took me way too long to complete this damn book considering how short it is, but I can understand why it was this book that made Bolano a superstar in the English world. I don't even know how to describe it except as being distinctly Bolano (which is a great thing).

The Lonely Londoners by Sam Selvon - Book about the influx of West Indians into London in the 50s and 60s. Amazing book that managed to have a sharp and biting portrayal of the discrimination that these colonials faced when going to the "motherland" while being pretty damn funny throughout. Selvon really nailed the humor aspect of it.

Native Son by Richard Wright - I can't believe I waited so long to read this book. What an unforgiving and scathing view of Chicago of the 30s and in 1930s US in general. Some parts I felt were a bit tacked on, but overall pretty damn amazing.

Aunt Julia and The Scriptwriter by Mario Vargas Llosa - Just about finished with this and it has been nothing short of amazing (which gets me excited for future works since this seems to be considered minor Vargas Llosa). The parallels between Mario's life and these insane soap operas and the view on the art of writing and what it means to be a writer are all amazing. And again, the humor that is all throughout the novel is fantastic.

I think I need to find some books on the study of humor because I really think writing humor is far more difficult than any other type of writing and I think it has a far more biting effect.

Sitting on my desk waiting to be read next:

Life: A User's Manual by Georges Perec
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Vanguard
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« Reply #854 on: March 24, 2011, 10:32:38 AM »

One of the best things I've learned about writing humor is this: if during the course of composition you don't laugh once, it isn't funny.

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Thoren: Astronomers fucking love stars and shit. Whitman was a bitch.
Hidoshi: Walt Whitman could beat you with both dicks tied behind his back.
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