Author Topic: Book Thread Continued

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Arvis

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1890 on: May 31, 2017, 05:15:38 PM »
Weren't there (or aren't there) some human cultures that consider 30 the age of true adulthood?
"You know, you're pretty cool too, Arvis.  You like good music, good games, and good tennis." - Divingfalcons

Dincrest

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1891 on: May 31, 2017, 05:50:15 PM »
When I said "old farts" I meant it in more colloquially jesting sense.  I see guys in my cycling club who are in their 60s and even 70s logging 100-200 miles a week on their bicycles and I look up to them like, "I wanna be you when I grow up!" 

And several cultures hold the 30s in high esteem, Arvis.  I heard somewhere that there is a French proverb that a woman doesn't become truly interesting until around age 35.  That proverb stuck with me because the US is such a youth oriented culture that almost frowns upon veneration. 

Anyway, I just passed the House of Tom Bombadil chapter in Fellowship of the Ring.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2017, 08:38:17 PM by Lando »
"I think I'm losing it.  I'm pulling out my hair trying to figure out what couch defines me as a person.  This is freaking madness.  This is hopeless.  This... my perfect little habitat here, and I still don't even know who I am."  - from Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom by Burnt By The Sun

Jimmy

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1892 on: June 09, 2017, 04:51:34 AM »
I finished off Feast for Crows today. It was slow until the last hundred pages, and then it turned into another cliffhanger ending. Still, I need a break before going to Dance with Dragons so I decided to read Nemesis Games, fifth book in The Expanse series next. Not really a lighter read per se, but definitely shorter. If I still need a breather before Dance with Dragons, then I will read a Redwall book after I finish up Nemesis Games. They seem like the perfect (borrowing Neal's term) palate cleanser books to me.

Dincrest

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1893 on: June 12, 2017, 06:34:01 PM »
I haven't gotten as far into Lord of the Rings as I want to because all the other stuff I have going on in my life hasn't given me as much "sit down and read" time as I'd like.  I'm about 11 or 12 chapters into Fellowship and I just finished the part where Frodo,
Spoiler: show
Sam, Merry, Pippin, and Strider are in the dell and one of the black riders stabs Frodo with a poison dagger.
"I think I'm losing it.  I'm pulling out my hair trying to figure out what couch defines me as a person.  This is freaking madness.  This is hopeless.  This... my perfect little habitat here, and I still don't even know who I am."  - from Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom by Burnt By The Sun

Jimmy

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1894 on: June 25, 2017, 06:17:36 PM »
I finished Nemesis Games a day ago. I actually stayed up most of the night to read the last two hundred pages because it was so good. The first couple hundred pages are slow, but then some craziness happens and it takes off. Second best book in The Expanse so far.

I started reading Dance with Dragons. Not even a hundred pages into it and The Gunslinger became available at the library. Luckily that one is short so I should be able to read them both. I want to read The Gunslinger because the movie trailer looks so good. But I also want to catch up on Dance with Dragons so I can binge seasons 4-6 of the show.

Book lover's problem.

Dincrest

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1895 on: June 25, 2017, 06:20:11 PM »
In Lord of the Rings, Frodo woke up in
Spoiler: show
Rivendell, had a chat with Gandalf, enjoyed a massive feast, had a heart-to-heart with Bilbo in the Hall of Fire, and tomorrow morning everyone will council with Elrond.
"I think I'm losing it.  I'm pulling out my hair trying to figure out what couch defines me as a person.  This is freaking madness.  This is hopeless.  This... my perfect little habitat here, and I still don't even know who I am."  - from Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom by Burnt By The Sun

Dincrest

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1896 on: July 13, 2017, 07:39:12 PM »
Ugh, "The Elrond Council" chapter has to be the longest, most boring, most tedious chapter I've read thus far.  90% of it was pointless and needlessly verbose exposition.  It also illustrates one thing that turned me off the book the first time.  The dialogue lacks personality and I could never quite tell who was speaking, because everyone read the same.  Even Boromir, who is not known for his patience, spoke in a rather verbose manner and his pointed dialogue lacked pointiness.  And with all this talking, it's a wonder the enemy hasn't razed the town yet.  Are they taking tea while the heroes talk?
« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 08:20:28 PM by Dincrest »
"I think I'm losing it.  I'm pulling out my hair trying to figure out what couch defines me as a person.  This is freaking madness.  This is hopeless.  This... my perfect little habitat here, and I still don't even know who I am."  - from Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom by Burnt By The Sun

Jimmy

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1897 on: July 26, 2017, 06:30:50 PM »
I'm going to fall short of my recreational reading goals this summer, but that's okay. I'll get a few books read over the holidays and next summer. Anyway, I've found Dance with Dragons incredibly difficult to get into. I think this is because Feast for Crows was rather lackluster and thus far Dance with Dragons is more of the same. At least with Feast for Crows I was coming off the high of Storm of Swords, but no such luck with Dance with Dragons. Regardless, I'm going to get it finished before the semester starts. I'm about three hundred pages into it so far.

While on vacation I swung by a used bookstore while my wife had a hair appointment and I picked up an old pulp sci-fi novel from the early 80s called The Water of Thought by Fred Saberhagen. The cover was classic pulp, and the interior has some cool, almost psychedelic artwork, so I couldn't resist. So far it is actually quite good.

Dincrest

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1898 on: July 26, 2017, 06:49:39 PM »
I actually liked A Feast For Crows because thought it didn't have a lot of action, it had a ton of worldbuilding.  It was refreshing to kinda experience day-to-day with various characters.  A Dance with Dragons balances the "daily grind" with progressing the story, but those two books are more-or-less just chess pieces moving into place on the precipice of something huge happening. 

As for my own reading, it's been spotty.  I'm still reading Lord of the Rings and the Fellowship is in the mines of Moria. 

I also snagged this book Blackmark by Jean Lowe Carlson for free.  I initially just wanted a sample, but the entire first book was free, so yay.  I haven't started it yet, but it intrigues me because Carlson is a female author writing in that GRRM or Joe Abercrombie vein and I feel like I haven't read enough epic fantasy by female authors.  I hear it's good, though it has some rookie stumbles, and that the second book is better.  We'll see... eventually.
"I think I'm losing it.  I'm pulling out my hair trying to figure out what couch defines me as a person.  This is freaking madness.  This is hopeless.  This... my perfect little habitat here, and I still don't even know who I am."  - from Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom by Burnt By The Sun

Rucks

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1899 on: July 26, 2017, 07:09:36 PM »
this book



is probably the most uplifting and inspiring thing I've read in the last decade.

Judaism is a beautiful, insightful and wholly rational faith (which I wouldn't have associated it with before I finished this).

restored my faith in a higher power.


Arvis

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1900 on: July 27, 2017, 10:46:56 AM »
As a fan of the "Old Testament" myself I find that take refreshing, @Rucks
"You know, you're pretty cool too, Arvis.  You like good music, good games, and good tennis." - Divingfalcons

Tooker

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1901 on: July 28, 2017, 01:05:33 PM »
I recently read a book called Hold Me Closer, Necromancer. Fully enjoyed it. Funny, a bit scary, good stuff. Next up is the sequel, Necromancing the Stone. :)
Those who believe in telekinetics, raise my hand.
—Kurt Vonnegut

Dincrest

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1902 on: July 29, 2017, 01:14:55 PM »
In Lord of the Rings, the Company has made it to Lothlorien Forest.  And I must say, I do not like Boromir's
Spoiler: show
character at all.  All I've seen of him is whining and complaining about the journey being difficult and the paths being perilous.  Come on, man!  You're supposed to be this hardened warrior who is used to battles and questing, yet here you are bellyaching like a little wuss every time there's a stone in your shoe.  Dude, the Hobbits, who have NEVER left the comfort of the Shire and NEVER known "roughing it" are not complaining at all and are enduring the journey better than you.  *snidely* Some warrior you are.  Put on your big-boy pants, pal!
« Last Edit: July 29, 2017, 08:54:33 PM by Dincrest »
"I think I'm losing it.  I'm pulling out my hair trying to figure out what couch defines me as a person.  This is freaking madness.  This is hopeless.  This... my perfect little habitat here, and I still don't even know who I am."  - from Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom by Burnt By The Sun

Tooker

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1903 on: July 31, 2017, 11:46:04 PM »
As you learn more about his relationship with his family later on, that actually makes some sense.
Those who believe in telekinetics, raise my hand.
—Kurt Vonnegut

ironmage

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Re: Book Thread Continued
« Reply #1904 on: August 01, 2017, 07:33:35 PM »
Ian Fleming - Live and Let Die:  This is one of the source novels for the James Bond movie series.  (Duh.)

Cover artwork:
Spoiler: show




This book is pulp.  Unashamedly, unreservedly pulp, and I mean that in the best possible way;  this is a fun read.  Fleming's prose is quick and clean, there are no dead spots or breaks in the action, and I finished it almost in a single sitting.  There was one point where, while riding a plane in a storm, Bond contemplated his own mortality, but the moment passed, and the book returned to its regularly scheduled sex and violence.

If you've ever seen a Bond movie, you know the basic plot (spoilers!):  Bond is sent to investigate a connection between Russia and organized crime; he gets captured, meets the girl, escapes, and absconds with the girl to Florida; the girl is kidnapped; Bond's CIA friend is almost killed to death, and Bond gets revenge by dropping a bad guy into a shark tank; he travels to the Caribbean, sneaks into Mr. Big's island fortress, is captured again, blows everything up, and finally gets the girl.

I tripped over some of the 1950's British English at a couple points, and Fleming seems to have an odd propensity for discussing what Bond has for breakfast (would someone really order both orange juice and coffee?).  I don't think this book could be published today;  its portrayal of American black people and culture is...dated, shall we say.  But this isn't the sort of book one reads for its social commentary.

I tried at certain points to project one of the actors from the movies into the book, but it didn't really work; Connery seemed too much of a gentleman, and Moore was too cavalier.  This Bond is a bit more human, a bit more fallible, and definitely more R-rated.  During one of Bond's escapes, he kicks one of his captors in the balls with a steel-toed shoe.  The kick sends the guy over a railing into a stairwell, and the fall kills him, so I guess he didn't suffer very long.
...I wonder if that scene made it into the movie.