Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
November 26, 2014, 12:40:55 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
We have a new board! Pop on over to the Game Journals section and tell us what you've been playing!
338442 Posts in 13854 Topics by 2215 Members
Latest Member: RPGtourguide
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  RPGFan Message Boards
|-+  The Rest
| |-+  General Discussions
| | |-+  Micro-transactions - Just another way to get us to pay more?
« previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Print
Author Topic: Micro-transactions - Just another way to get us to pay more?  (Read 2457 times)
Cauton
Posts: 655


Member
*

cauton42@hotmail.com
View Profile

Ignore
« on: April 03, 2006, 04:55:13 PM »

From today on you can download armor for your mounts in Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion from the Xbox Live Marketplace. Microsoft have been preaching the awesomeness of these "micro-transactions" from the time they unveiled the plans for their new Xbox Live service, and Sony and Nintendo will be including similar functions in their online services.

Am I the only one who find this trend incredibly alarming? Isn't there a real posibility that some of the less scrupulous publishers will opt to cut certain features from their games, only to release them on the marketplace at a later time?

With most next-gen games having $60 as suggested retail price, is it really reasonble to expect us to pay even more to be able to enjoy our games to the fullest? I personally hope that this armor pack for Oblivion is recieved by a massive backlash from gamers, and that this trend dies before it has even started.

What do the rest of you think? Would you pay $3 to add extra features to a game you've already spent at least fifty bucks on?
Logged
John
Administrator
Posts: 7303


Member
*

DeceptiJohn
View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2006, 05:07:15 PM »

I pay $15/mo for new content in WoW.  Micropayments don't bother me much, though I'd love to see them do it the way Bungie distributed maps for Halo 2.  Buy them right when they come out, or download them for free way later.

-John
Logged

THROW PICKLE IN BURGER TO SPEED UP COMMERCIAL
Eusis
Administrator
Posts: 11808


Member
*


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2006, 05:09:16 PM »

It really depends on the features I'm getting. New multiplayer maps? Sure, that'd be nice. Paying nearly 3 bucks for /horse armor/ when I can go buy myself some fast food instead for that much? No thanks. :P

Though that'd have been useful when that unicorn attacked my horse.

Edit: And while this would be the most useful, definitely no to paying for patches, unless they add something major and significant to the game.
Logged
Cauton
Posts: 655


Member
*

cauton42@hotmail.com
View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2006, 05:18:39 PM »

In the case of MMOs you're not only paying for content patches, you're also paying for servers, bandwith and customer service personnel. So I don't really think it's a very good comparison to make.

And we're not really talking major features here. We're talking 5% of the total price for the retail version of the game, just to add one measly item. As another example, Namco has annouced that they will release additional cars and tracks on the Xbox Live Marketplace, for their Xbox360 Ridge Racer game. These are feature that they already know they want to put in the game, but they're going to make the consumer pay more than the already very high retail game price, to be able to access them. This is what I'm fearing will happen more and more - features intentionally being left out of the game, just to be able to make a few extra dollars off them on the marketplace.
Logged
daschrier
Posts: 1389

Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2006, 05:30:31 PM »

PC gamers have had this happen to them for years...with directors cuts and deluxe editions featuring bug fixes and added features.
Logged
Eusis
Administrator
Posts: 11808


Member
*


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2006, 05:46:31 PM »

Quote from: "daschrier"
PC gamers have had this happen to them for years...with directors cuts and deluxe editions featuring bug fixes and added features.

I recall that most of those, if not all, just had patches and expansions applied, the patches having been free in the first place and the expansions probably being more expensive stand alone than the game and expansion(s) combined in the premium re-releases.
Logged
Professor Gast
Posts: 1647


Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2006, 06:09:19 PM »

Several analysts have already hailed this as a major new source of revenue for the industry. In times when development costs are on the rise, this definitely comes in handy for companies.

Like others, I'm not too fond of the idea of having to pay a few euros for some random item. Then again, as long as the industry doesn't view this as a means to make really essential content available only for pay per download after the initial release, I don't mind.
Logged
Ryos
I can has demons?
Posts: 1700


Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2006, 07:38:07 PM »

I don't really have a problem with it (refer to John's MMO analogy), but then again since I'll be getting the PC version, I sort of expect mods for things like this to be available for free down the road by the users.  It may or may not reach the quality of the commercial additions, but free is free.  It's not like Bethesda is forcing you to add the content (trivial for the price that it may be).
Logged

It's never too late to start learning; it's always too early to stop learning.
Sazabirules
Posts: 363


Member
*

xTheRedCometx
View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2006, 08:04:07 PM »

I wouldn't pay for myself ever but I know others will. If it is released on the PC as well someone will just distribute the files for free anyways
Logged
Cauton
Posts: 655


Member
*

cauton42@hotmail.com
View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2006, 08:41:04 PM »

Gast's comment above begs this question:
What is essential content? At what point does content stop being essential, and become something arbitrary that can be sold separately without being detrimental to the overall quality of the game?

Take the example with Namco and Ridge Racer. They will sell cars and tracks on on the Xbox Live Marketplace. The concept behind Ridge Racer is to drive cars on tracks. Is the content that will be put up on the marketplace then essential, or not? How do you make the distinction?

Edit: After doing a bit of research I found out that Namco actually offer free cars for download through the marketplace. I will let the example stay, though, as I feel it's a good illustration of the dilemma involved with these micro-transactions.
Logged
Angelo
Sephiroth's Girlfriend
Posts: 231


Member
*


View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2006, 09:24:50 PM »

Quote from: "Professor Gast"
...development costs are on the rise


HAHAHAHAHAHA...you mean licensing/approval fees and executive salaries are on the rise?  :)
Logged

Eusis
Administrator
Posts: 11808


Member
*


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2006, 10:28:18 PM »

Quote from: "Cauton"
Gast's comment above begs this question:
What is essential content? At what point does content stop being essential, and become something arbitrary that can be sold separately without being detrimental to the overall quality of the game?

I'd say as long as you can play and enjoy the game without it, it isn't essential. Such as if the game had plenty of tracks and plenty of cars, there'd be no issue. Multiplayer maps for Halo 2 under your logic could be 'essential', but to me I consider them nice bonuses as you can still play and enjoy the game online without them. Now for that to be essential, it'd have to be something like there was only one map to play despite having bought the full game, but you had to buy 10 or so more online in order to actually enjoy it.

Edit: A late reply to Angelo's bit, but... How about also 'taking advantage of such predictions by pricing a 50 dollar game at 60 because it's 'next generation' despite zero improvements? :P
Logged
daschrier
Posts: 1389

Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #12 on: April 04, 2006, 10:12:02 AM »

Well, games are cheaper than they were back in the NES and SNES days...true the media is mostly why, as ROMs were expensive to make, but we're still making out better than before.
Logged
Cauton
Posts: 655


Member
*

cauton42@hotmail.com
View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #13 on: August 19, 2006, 06:51:13 AM »

Reviving this topic due to this.

A choice quote:
Quote
Microsoft mentioned a new kind of microtransaction at the session, as well, which they are calling "consumables." These purchases would be re-purchasable items i.e. if a game was selling 100 gold pieces, you would be able to rebuy 100 gold pieces when you needed them. The "consumables" tech will be included in this fall's release of the SDK.

Another thing Microsoft intends to add to the Marketplace is the ability for vendors placed in videogames to allow gamers to buy from the Marketplace. Say, there is a vendor in an RPG selling a rare sword and that sword is available on the Marketplace, players will be able to put the sword in a checkout cart and then return to the Marketplace later to complete the download. For now, the in-game Marketplace will bring the Marketplace experience into the gameplay, but the transactions, for now, will still need to be completed on the Marketplace and not in-game.


Sound great, eh?
Logged
Lucid
Posts: 315


Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #14 on: August 20, 2006, 12:59:01 PM »

Well, In the case of oblivion, if you don't like the idea of paying three dollars for something already in the game(they just unlock it for you essentially), you can always find somewhere to torrent it from for free.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!