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Author Topic: Tell me about buying a pet  (Read 12381 times)
Lucca
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« Reply #60 on: December 22, 2009, 07:27:12 PM »

No one here is being agtonistic. What you're doing is pretty much saying, "MY WAY IS RIGHT!" and glossing over the basics. When we express our opinions, we're attacking you. We're not.

How do I know this? I used to do this myself, until I realized I ain't all that. :3

Anyway, I USED to be for declawing because a cat scratched the hell out of me when I was a kid, and I was scared of them...that is until I was told what declawing actually IS. Now I'm staunchly against it. I'm also not really afraid of them anymore.

Besides a scratching post what are good deterrents for saving furniture, besides duct tape? I accept some scratching will be par de course, but I'd like to prevent some of it. I've heard lemon juice and water works. Or was it oranges? Maybe I'm full of bullcrap.
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Gen Eric Gui
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« Reply #61 on: December 22, 2009, 08:18:20 PM »

I dunno, people indirectly calling me a douche is pretty antagonistic in my book.  "You are a bad person" is pretty direct too.  I also didn't say "my way is right", I've been pretty much "we think differently, yours isn't the only answer here" this whole time.  Or at least, that's been my intention.


And yeah, I think somebody mentioned lemon water earlier in the thread.
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Lucca
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« Reply #62 on: December 22, 2009, 09:07:46 PM »

Keep in mind this is RPGFan, and half of the stuff said isn't meant with any seriousness. If it did, I'd be bawling like a baby and ran the other direction over 8 years ago.
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Daggerstrike
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« Reply #63 on: December 22, 2009, 09:27:56 PM »

I dunno, people indirectly calling me a douche is pretty antagonistic in my book.  "You are a bad person" is pretty direct too.  I also didn't say "my way is right", I've been pretty much "we think differently, yours isn't the only answer here" this whole time.  Or at least, that's been my intention.


And yeah, I think somebody mentioned lemon water earlier in the thread.

If you are referring to my first post in regards to the being indirectly called a douche then I apologize if you took it that way, it was not my intent. I think the act itself is douchey, but that doesn't make someone a douche in my book. It's like saying a girl is being bitchy or a kid is acting bratty, doesn't necessarily mean they are a bitch or a brat, it is simple the way they are being at that time. It's semantics, but to me it is an important difference.

 I am not the kind of person to call a person a douche indirectly, at least on purpose. If I think you are a douche, you know it. In this instance you are not a douche, a little touchy on the subject, but not a douche.
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« Reply #64 on: December 22, 2009, 09:41:02 PM »

But yeah, regarding the whole declawing thing..it sucks that there are still alot of apartment buildings where its required, and so its like..if you cant find a home for your cat..what do you do..give it back to a shelter after a year of ownership, or declaw it, and keep it, and hope he doesnt hold it against you haha.  I mean it was hard as hell deciding to do it, because again like many here say, I know what it really is.  But when I had picked him up, he was already close to getting the axe from what I could gather, since he had been there 6ish months without adoption, and the shelter was rather small due to the area I was in, and the building I was moving to, which I NEEDED to move to, due to money issues, would only accept them front declawed (despite there being no carpet..yeah believe me I fought tooth and nail..no pun intended) and so in the end I said ok, and did it.  Not particularly proud of it, but in my eyes, and I hope in my cats, its a better alternative to being dead (since it seemed the most likely outcome)

So as you can see, there are some rather rough issues involved with at least cats and dogs as pets.  Dont let that put you off, because honestly, there is nothing greater than a pet.  I myself am still more of a dog person, than a cat person, but both just..I dunno..make life not suck so much haha. 
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MeshGearFox
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« Reply #65 on: December 22, 2009, 09:56:18 PM »

Quote
PETA kills more animals annually than toxic waste spills. I hate those cocksuckers too.

Cocksucking shitfaggot titsack cuntbitches on a delicious toasted assfuck bun with a side of twatslaw in an East Yorkshire Rapegoddamn Sauce.
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« Reply #66 on: December 23, 2009, 12:59:19 AM »

So, shitting on the thread aside...

I looked up in my yellow pages today and found no near animal shelters except the humane society.  I'm going to look either tomorrow or Christmas Eve if they're open.  Me being a first time pet owner, are there any specific questions I should be asking / things I should look for other than don't take the ones that rush out?
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« Reply #67 on: December 23, 2009, 01:20:51 AM »

I dunno, people indirectly calling me a douche is pretty antagonistic in my book.  "You are a bad person" is pretty direct too.  I also didn't say "my way is right", I've been pretty much "we think differently, yours isn't the only answer here" this whole time.  Or at least, that's been my intention.


And yeah, I think somebody mentioned lemon water earlier in the thread.

Didn't call you a douche or a bad person dude. I know it sounds indirect, but it wasn't my intention.
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Parn
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« Reply #68 on: December 23, 2009, 02:02:29 AM »

So, shitting on the thread aside...

I looked up in my yellow pages today and found no near animal shelters except the humane society.  I'm going to look either tomorrow or Christmas Eve if they're open.  Me being a first time pet owner, are there any specific questions I should be asking / things I should look for other than don't take the ones that rush out?

You'll know when you find your pet.  I wasn't even thinking about getting a pet the day I adopted my cat, as I was just looking around.  She just happened to be really taken with me for some reason, it was weird.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtsWGwX-wxg


Basically, you don't want a cat like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrxduZ47yOg
« Last Edit: December 23, 2009, 02:16:13 AM by Parn » Logged
Tomara
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« Reply #69 on: December 23, 2009, 03:06:33 AM »

With rabbits I always take the one that rushes forward and tries to bite my fingers off, but that may not be a such good idea with cats and dogs. With cats, the more intelligent ones usually do their own thing, instead of rushing forward to try and get your attention. The nice ones will approach you later on or let you approach them. The ones that keep glaring at you can still be nice, but their friendship just isn't cheap. They are very independent, usually more for watching than cuddling.

Always ask the people at the shelter what they know about an animals behaviour, temperament and special needs. Also, always ask about their health. Young animals can be surprisingly weak. If it has been living in bad conditions from the day it was born till the day it was rescued, health problems are not uncommon. It may have a weak immume system. With puppies, it can be difficult to determine what their temperament will be like later on. Whith adult dogs it's more "what you see is what you get".

Dogs at a shelter can be very stressed, so their level of activity probably isn't the same as it would be at home. Dogs at shelters also bark often. If you walk past one and it barks, try to figure out why it does so. Does it want you to go away or does it want your attention? If it barks a lot, it will probably continue this behaviour at home, keep that in mind. The shelter we got our former dog from let us take him on a 30-minute walk to get to know him better and to help him relax. If that's possible at your local shelter, I highly recommend it. In any case, you want some time alone with the dog to see how he reacts in a more normal situation. A room in which you can play with him is fine too.

When you're alone with the dogs, see what he finds most interesting, you or his surroundings. The playful ones will want a lot of your attention. Not a very good choice if it has to stay home alone a lot. If it's more interested in its surroundings, the dog it more independant. See how it is on a leash, even a little trip around the room and down the hallway can tell a lot. Some dogs are very enthousiastic and want you to drag you over to whatever they find interesting. This may be a problem if the dog large, but if you don't mind the pulling you don't have to worry about it. If the dog is scared of something in its environment (for instance a moving bicycle, a newspaper or an umbrella being opened) and doesn't show any curiosity towards it, it may be trouble.

Even if you don't plan on getting any other pets, ask how the dog is with other dogs.

For both cats and dogs, eyes can tell you a lot. You can let both of them know things are okay by looking them into the eye and slowly blinking. If a cat does this to you, you're very lucky, because it accepts you and feels comfortable around you. A dog's eyes can tell a lot as well. A dog that casts its eyes downward and doesn't look scared acknowledges you as the leader, which is very important for a familydog. A dog that looks you right in the eye is challenging you and will take a lot of time to accept you as the alpha. While these can be great dogs, they are not dogs for beginners.

« Last Edit: December 23, 2009, 03:32:37 AM by Tomara » Logged
GrimReality
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« Reply #70 on: December 23, 2009, 10:47:35 AM »

Not to stoke the fire back up again, but I actually am in agreement with Gen. I don't get to say that too often, so I had to take the opportunity.
I've had a lot of cats in my life. Most of them have been de-clawed. They were also indoor cats that pretty much never went outside except to go to the vet. Seemed like perfectly happy cats to me.
The one or two outdoor cats we had were left intact, for obvious reasons.
I think it is reasonable to want a cat, and also want presentable furniture. This has nothing to do with loving your furniture more than your cat. I certainly don't.
I also think a lot(if not most) of people are simply unaware of what really happens when a cat is de-clawed. I know I am. I never took the time to look it up. It's just what you did when you got a cat.
Kinda like having a baby boy and getting him cut. It's just what you DID. I never considered otherwise.
I imagine if more people educated themselves on things instead of just mindlessly agreeing to such procedures, they wouldn't happen as often.
My current cat, Merlin, is 10 years old. He's pretty awesome, but has had some health problems, and may not be around much longer. We will certainly get a new cat(or cats, as I would like more than one) after he dies. I will seriously consider NOT de-clawing them now that I am better educated on the process. My wife will probably not go for that. We'll see.

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« Reply #71 on: December 24, 2009, 07:37:06 AM »

Randomly, I'd like you all to try imagine someone ripping the bones of your toes out of your feet, and then smashing part of it with a hammer so it doesn't grow back. Bet you'll be able to walk super great. Anyway...



Not to stoke the fire back up again, but I actually am in agreement with Gen. I don't get to say that too often, so I had to take the opportunity.
I've had a lot of cats in my life. Most of them have been de-clawed. They were also indoor cats that pretty much never went outside except to go to the vet. Seemed like perfectly happy cats to me.
How would you honestly know, though? Content I'd say, sure, having a master to care for them, but declawing makes them submissive bitches and oft takes away their self-confidence. I really don't want to seem like a total jerk, but then again, this is me we're talking about, let's go!

As many of you know, I'm also a very heavy anti-abortion person. I got my reasons, just like some have their reasons to be for it. I'm not here to discuss that though. My goal is just to put some facts about declawing in the opening for the hell of it.

First, let me say that good sir Grim is lucky to have had a good vet declaw his cats. Or so, I hope. You never had to deal with tissue  necrosis did you? For those unaware, I speak of this:





For those who may be thinking "how the fuck does that happen by taking off a cat's toenails?" Well, they aren't even close to nails that humans have.

Quote
Because the claw develops from germinal tissue deep within the third phalanx, amputation of the bone is necessary to remove the claw. The terms "onychectomy" (origin: Greek onycho, nail + ektome, excision) and "declawing" imply mere claw removal, but a more appropriate description would be phalangectomy[1], excision of toe bone

[Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Declawing]


Just for fun:




Sorry but declawing is fucking horrifyingly disgusting to me. Not on par with abortion at all, and I just used that as a reference of stating facts and letting other people decide. However, I'm a man who firmly believes in doing unto others that which he would allow to be done to him. Similarly, I ask none to do what I would not do myself, etc, Air Force, yay.

I really just think people need to be educated on this more. I know a lot of folks think, and have no reason NOT to think a cat's claw is much like a toenail from a human. It's far more complex than that, however, and declawing involves removing the ability for the claw to grow, which it needs to do to chip to retain its sharpness. However, it is not like having a nail ripped off your finger, which the ladies, I'm sure, can tell you is not pleasant. However, imagine the ends of your toes and fingers, not the whole thing, just the ends, so you are left with deformed, mangled stubs that you can barely walk upon. I'm sure after years of this they would get used to it, however, no cat will ever be "happy" again in their lives after having the masters they trust so much, take them somewhere to have their hands smashed and crushed off. Believe me, if they had claws still, they'd probably kill you in your sleep.

So to anyone who says they want to protect their furniture, I feel you on that, shit can be pricey. However, I don't see people cutting off their infant/toddler's hands for drawing on the wall. We make adjustments for such things, do we not? Why can't we do the same with a pet
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Dincrest
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« Reply #72 on: December 24, 2009, 01:28:03 PM »

Re: spaying/neutering.  Some humans spay and neuter themselves via vasectomies and tube-tying. 

ASIDE: That's one thing I thought was really cool about my old doberman; he had drop ears.  No ear cropping nonsense there.  As others would say, we "kept him English."  He did come to us with a docked tail, though.  Seeing him wag a stub just didn't look right.  But we adopted him when he was 2 years old, so what was done was done without our blessing.  If we had a choice, we'd like to have had his tail fully intact. 

All shenanigans and debates aside, hope you find a good animal companion, Akanbe.  Like I said, even if it takes a while before you find that animal you just have that "mojo" bond with, don't rush the process.  It is like a relationship or a marriage. 

Oh, would animal gender make a difference?  Like isn't it easier to housebreak a female animal to use particular spots for a toilet than a male animal, since male animals mark territory and will pee on any soft surface if left to their own devices?  On the other hand, female animals come into heat and that can sometimes be messy.  Of course personality comes into play; some animals are just naturally more stubborn than others, just like people.  Two kids can come from the same parent and one may be easier to potty train than the other. 

Obviously, whatever animal you bond with you bond with, but that might be something to think about for a first time owner? 
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Lucca
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« Reply #73 on: January 01, 2010, 11:41:38 PM »

So, shitting on the thread aside...

I looked up in my yellow pages today and found no near animal shelters except the humane society.  I'm going to look either tomorrow or Christmas Eve if they're open.  Me being a first time pet owner, are there any specific questions I should be asking / things I should look for other than don't take the ones that rush out?

You'll know when you find your pet.  I wasn't even thinking about getting a pet the day I adopted my cat, as I was just looking around.  She just happened to be really taken with me for some reason, it was weird.

Quoted for truth. This actually happened to me on New Years Eve.

I took my friend to see a really high-scale shelter (it's run by charity and saves cats and dogs on the euthenasia list to be adopted) and lo and behold this 2 year old cat and I really bonded almost INSTANTLY. She even let me pet her gently as she ate, purred at me, rubbed against my legs. She was just a sweetheart. I knew she was 'the one'.

So I adopted her. Her name's Twinkle. She's currently investigating my apartment and mewing at me because I won't open the cupboards for her to investigate. She also loves to rub against her scratching pad as I rub her tummy. She's already headbutted me alot.

If you get a new cat, make sure to confine it in a small room for about 24 hours because it WILL freak out. My cat actually adjusted pretty quickly  because she's naturally curious, but she did hide behind my toilet for a while. She's only now investigating my living room/kitchen. I let her come in when SHE felt ready.

By the way, any hints with cat smells? I keep her litter box clean and she's got the scoopable litter (I clean it every day) but she still is a BIG SMELLY BABY. Any hints?
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MeshGearFox
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« Reply #74 on: January 02, 2010, 02:21:37 AM »

Quote
If you get a new cat, make sure to confine it in a small room for about 24 hours because it WILL freak out. My cat actually adjusted pretty quickly  because she's naturally curious, but she did hide behind my toilet for a while. She's only now investigating my living room/kitchen. I let her come in when SHE felt ready.

\When we found Gracy this summer, we had to keep her outside for awhile because our older cat, being an indoor cat and an only-cat-child, hadn't been vaccinated in awhile. Then, after we got her checked out by the vet and brought her indoors, we still had to keep her crated during the day for awhile because she was just soooo baby.

Unfortunately I don't really know how she reacted when she started hanging around by herself alone because that first week we sort of had to go to florida for some family thing and the neighbor (who got Gracy's one brother) took care of her. Later, when she was in our house more, I was at my stupid fucking janitorial job jesus christ I hated that shit. Anyway, my mom was taking care of her during that time (because my mom's a teacher and gets summer off. Whereas I was cleaning the school. NEED NEW JOB. PLEASE STOP SUCKING ECONOMY).

We still have to lock her away at night because she's sort of a dick to the other cat (who's autistic as fuck and screams if anything touches her. Bitey, touchey cat + autism cat = lots and lots of horrific screaming at two in the morning). (Autism cat also has an evil foot).
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o/` I only stare at the door and smoke o/`

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