Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
August 28, 2014, 05:13:15 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
RPGFan Community Quiz
Next Quiz Date: January 11, 2014
Subject: 999 (Nintendo DS)
For more information click HERE!
329776 Posts in 13518 Topics by 2179 Members
Latest Member: Lian_Kazairl
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  RPGFan Message Boards
|-+  Media
| |-+  Single-Player RPGs
| | |-+  "On-Rails" RPGs
« previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] Print
Author Topic: "On-Rails" RPGs  (Read 2696 times)
OkamiGeisha
Posts: 82

Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #15 on: October 20, 2010, 01:14:45 PM »

I can deal with RPGs being linear for the purpose of telling the story, and I can understand areas being closed off until later times in the story, but overall I think they should open up.  I really hate being prevented from going back to a place I previously visited when you need to grind or missed something.. like in Eternal Sonate when you get to Forte City. 
Logged
MeshGearFox
Posts: 8449


HERE ON RUM ISLAND WE DO NOT BELIEVE IN RUM!

Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #16 on: October 20, 2010, 01:51:03 PM »

I don't mind a linear storyline. There's nothing wrong with that.

I don't even really mind a linear game progression.

What I do mind is like, linear strategization. Like... do boss battles have a specific, set strategy you need to figure out to win? That's sort of lame. Are there only a really limited and specific group of workable character builds? Also lame. Are dungeons literally a single straight path with no exploration? Lame!

I think my ideal system is sort of... let's call it linear+. You have essentially a linear game, but you can take sidequests if you want, or go off and explore dungeons outside of what you need to. Or you have a lot of little story choices that affect the ending even if the main game is still pretty linear. And the gameplay, as I mentioned above, should give you options in how you strategize. How you build your characters, how you approach combat, etc.

Also this varies a lot in its execution. Technically Morrowind could be considered this since the actual main quest line was almost completely linear with a few exceptions/being able to technically skip it all.

Basically my main issue with really linear games is that it reduces a lot of the areas to sort of one off things that you never go back to. So it doesn't matter HOW much you liked town X, you literally never have any reason to go back there after the story goes on.

Also I'm a fan of how Zelda does things. You can revisit and enter previously blocked off areas when you get some tool/ability that lets you do so. Not because the story dictates you can go there. I mean maybe the story dictates when you get that ability/you need to play through the story to figure out how to get said ability, but still. It shifts interactivity back to the player, which is good.
Logged

o/` I do not feel joy o/`
o/` I do not dream o/`
o/` I only stare at the door and smoke o/`

Archendrus
Posts: 174


Member
*


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #17 on: October 20, 2010, 03:31:16 PM »

I support the linear+ concept =D  All of my favorite RPGs are linear.  It makes for a better overall presentation of the story I think.  In a non-linear game such as Fallout 3 or Oblivion, the story just doesn't come across as strong to me.  I'm thinking mainly of sidequests and things of that nature. It's compareable to reading a novel, stopping and then reading a dozen or so unrelated short stories, then trying to pick up the novel from where you left off.  A linear game guides you through and sets the pace, like a good novel. 

I do like non-linear when it comes in the form of choices that affect the main story.  But too many unrelated side quests, or "oddjobs" just take away from the overall experience for me and make me feel like I'm neglecting the "real" game.  I actually think I'd like the Fallout 3/Oblivion style more if there was no main story at all, just a huge world and tons of small stories.  Are there any games like that?
Logged
MeshGearFox
Posts: 8449


HERE ON RUM ISLAND WE DO NOT BELIEVE IN RUM!

Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #18 on: October 20, 2010, 07:01:46 PM »

Quote
In a non-linear game such as Fallout 3 or Oblivion, the story just doesn't come across as strong to me.

This is less a matter of linearity and more of Bethesda's writing team sucking.

The idea of a non-linear storyline is that it *reacts* to the player, ergo, what you DO forms the story. This works in a lot of non-RPGs. Go read those Dwarf Fortress LPs if you want an example of it working insanely well.

I've never really seen an RPG pull it off though. Most RPGs that do non-linear are just wads of sidequests which is missing the point entirely.

The secondary point of non-linear, that facilitates the main point I mentioned above, is to let the player Do Cool Shit. Sidequests do not let you do cool shit. Not inherently, anyway. And most of the time they're just little set story fragments where you can't do jack.
Logged

o/` I do not feel joy o/`
o/` I do not dream o/`
o/` I only stare at the door and smoke o/`

Prime Mover
Posts: 2792


All's fair in love, war, and the recording studio

Member
*

Shattre
View Profile WWW Email

Ignore
« Reply #19 on: October 20, 2010, 08:41:47 PM »

I think my favorite example of story progression is FF9. The story is linear, but the path you take through it is full of branches, backtracking, crossing over previously-treaded areas, etc. As you progress, it not only becomes easier to visit previous destinations, but the story will lead you back to those places with good reasons for doing so. On top of that, the locales change during different parts of the story, sometimes getting destroyed and rebuilt. So while you have the fun of revisting places you've been before, you see them change too. I also don't mind open-world adventures but where you simply can't go everywhere at first because of the difficulty spikes. It's no fun to be able to go everywhere from the very beginning, because you quickly see everything and then it gets repeatative, but if the diffulty prevents you from going places until you're able to later, that makes sense. But the story should be fairly linear, at least to a point, so that it is able to have some continuity and progression. I hate mission-based games, because they are just a series of events, and there's no tension/release to the drama.
Logged


eelhouse.net
- order the new album

Currently Playing: Metroid Prime 2, Trails in the Sky, Bioshock: Infinite
Currently Listening to: Devin Townsend, Dream Theater
Watching: Star Trek: TOS, Slayers, Doctor Who (as usual)
Aeolus
I'm not evil!
Posts: 6235


Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #20 on: October 22, 2010, 02:45:40 AM »

Edit: Thank you shining force 3 sux thread for reminding me that RPG Fan sux.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2010, 03:00:59 PM by KillerArmoire » Logged

You've misunderstood me. I just seek your death only because you're in the way of my goal of world conquest. I can't help it that I have evil ambitions and am named Dark Lord. Honest.
JurassicPrinny
Posts: 13


Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #21 on: October 22, 2010, 12:46:42 PM »

When you say on-rails my first thought is of Virtua Cop style shooters, but I know what you mean about linearity.

I prefer a solid story so I tend to go for jrpgs more than open-world stuff. Probably the only thing I really hated about Oblivion (and most other open world games) was being able to go to Kvatch, tell the commander of the comically small barricade I'll come back later, and come back months later to find the city is still burning and they're still waiting for you. I played Final Fantasy (1) on PSP last year and spent nearly 10 hours in the middle of the game wandering about trying to find where the story had gone, before finally giving in and checking a walkthough. The world should have been thoroughly conquered by the forces of Chaos, but no - he waited for the four heroes of light (no relation) to turn up instead.

The fact that the storyline has a deadline in Atelier Rorona made it a day-one purchase for me. If the world (or a small shop) needs to be saved it should need to be saved - waiting until you've had enough of fighting giant rodents should not be an option.
Logged
insertnamehere
Posts: 1297


Member
*


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #22 on: October 25, 2010, 03:36:12 AM »

I support the linear+ concept =D All of my favorite RPGs are linear. It makes for a better overall presentation of the story I think. In a non-linear game such as Fallout 3 or Oblivion, the story just doesn't come across as strong to me. I'm thinking mainly of sidequests and things of that nature. It's compareable to reading a novel, stopping and then reading a dozen or so unrelated short stories, then trying to pick up the novel from where you left off. A linear game guides you through and sets the pace, like a good novel.

I do like non-linear when it comes in the form of choices that affect the main story. But too many unrelated side quests, or "oddjobs" just take away from the overall experience for me and make me feel like I'm neglecting the "real" game. I actually think I'd like the Fallout 3/Oblivion style more if there was no main story at all, just a huge world and tons of small stories. Are there any games like that?

Summoner has a bunch of small stories (about 90% seems to be npc sidequest/stories) although its instruction booklet indicates that it does have a main story and it has a crappy battle system (that i can remember) and shitty world map.
I decided to stop playing it since it was too nonlinear
Logged

come get high with me
ba dum tissssss
Pages: 1 [2] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!