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Author Topic: think this has any chance of passing?  (Read 1322 times)
Azrael
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« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2011, 06:31:13 PM »

I can't produce numbers, but there are just so many services out there today that remove a lot of the incentive to pirate precisely because they offer avenues for artists to promote their music in ways that people get to listen to them for free, such as bandcamp as Starmongoose posted. Also, now, a lot of artists are turning to services like indiegogo and kickstarter which has really given them a lot of control over how to distribute their albums. I know I kind of derailed this topic, but I just hate when people start feeling like they're entitled to certain things this law would prevent (as stupid as the law may be). I agree with you on a lot of things, and I am well aware of how much money artists make/lose due to piracy and record sales, but I can't agree with the "there isn't a problem" viewpoint because I do think it should be up to the artist whether they feel they should give that music away for free. And honestly, so many artists are completely willing to do just that.

And my stance isn't "I believe all piracy should be abolished" so much as it is "if they want to fight to protect their copyrights, they have every right to do so."
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Vanguard
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« Reply #16 on: July 06, 2011, 10:36:56 AM »

I agree, should an artist want to protect their copyrighted material, let them do it. The problem is that all of the available avenues don't work or alienate fans. The best way to fight piracy, as Starmongoose pointed out, is to give your fans a reason to purchase your album.

A large part of the problem is that the old business model, which the record industry is still based on, does not work. Since the 1920s, a group/artist would record a song (later in the 60s, an album), and the record company would distribute it to radio stations and hope it would encourage sales. However, between the Great Depression and World War II, it was only the wealthy who could afford luxury items like 78s. Almost everybody had a radio though, and used that as their source of entertainment.

All that money, glamor, and stardom we associate with the music industry didn't actually come around until the 1960s. The reasons the music industry exploded are a combination of the post-war economic boom, the counter-culture, and the birth of the album as a cohesive concept.

Since then, artists and record companies have been trying to replicate that success. While there are many factors, one of the biggest reasons why it hasn't happened is the ridiculous overhead it takes to launch an artist's career. The cost of promoting a single nationally is estimated at $1,000,000. The standard advance on a record contract is $125,000. That's all money the artist needs to pay back. On record sales alone, an artist would need to sell 250,000 copies of their album to break even. The overwhelming majority of artists don't.

The independent scene is a lot different. The artist receives no advance, but split the costs of recording the album with their label. Some promotion is done, but they rely heavily on word of mouth and the college music scene. If an artist at this level sells 10,000 copies of an album, they actually make more money than an artist on a major label who sells 200,000 copies.
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Ashton
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« Reply #17 on: July 06, 2011, 11:51:04 AM »

This law is retarded. It's basically a method for corporations to try and control information.

Bad video review? That's illegal. Take it down, or we'll sue. Take it down, and we'll sue for good measure anyway.

Good video review? Your ass remains financially unmolested.
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Azrael
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« Reply #18 on: July 06, 2011, 12:04:38 PM »

The law I think has little chance of passing, and they'd also have to contend with provisions in copyright law that allows for samples of any piece of intellectual property for educational or review purposes (unless this law is seeking to circumvent that).

And Vanguard, trust me, I agree with everything you're saying, this topic just got a kneejerk reaction from me because I feel like too many fans feel entitled to certain actions regarding music and that a lot of artists are kind of strung out to dry with absolutely no way to fight it.
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