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Author Topic: 1UP: Why the Golden Age of JRPGs is Over  (Read 10575 times)
Ashton
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« Reply #120 on: July 23, 2011, 01:08:43 PM »

That's not completely fair. I could say Okami pales in comparison to many brush paintings I've seen, but that would be doing a disservice to its visual achievements, regardless of if I like its aesthetics or not.
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Tomara
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« Reply #121 on: July 23, 2011, 01:19:03 PM »

You can't walkthrough or interact with brush paintings though. The trees outside, well, I could just go outside and get a closer look. I could smell them too. Heck, I could even hug them if I felt like it. Why would I walk through realistically rendered digital woods when the real thing is much more inpressive?

In a decent Japanese RPG you've got atleast some gigantic cherry trees in full bloom or something. Sure, we got those too, but they're much smaller and the blossoms are gone within a few weeks.

So yeah, between the uncanny characters and the relatively boring environments, I just don't really get the aesthetic appeal of games likeThe Witcher 2 and Oblivion. They don't look horrible or anything, just kind of boring.
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Ashton
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« Reply #122 on: July 23, 2011, 01:29:28 PM »

The problem with your reasoning is that you're essentially saying that one form of aesthetic is better than the other. Again, it does a disservice to both aesthetic styles when you do things like that. I'm not saying that you have to play Witcher 2 or anything (I haven't played it yet myself, lacking a computer that can run it), but to use comparisons like that is absurd.

If I say, "I refuse to play Tales games. Stupid animu graphics. Why can't they put in more realistic ones? Keep that anime shit to dating sims, that's all nerds play anyway." it'd be as bad as if I say, "Fuck Mass Effect, who wants ultrarealism and gay bald space marines? They should make it more anime-like. Stupid fratboy games." It ignores the tone and setting of the existing narrative entirely, and ends up demeaning both styles of aesthetics, because they're not interchangeable.

Comparing realistic games to real life and anime games to anime also ends in a similarly absurd conclusion. There's no real meaningful way you can interact with certain in-game objects, but that's not why they are there. Sure you can go touch and smell the tree, but why would you want to? Sure you could watch an anime with trees in the background instead of playing an anime game, but again, what's the point? That's not the goal of the game.
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hell_snake
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« Reply #123 on: July 23, 2011, 01:42:41 PM »

I would like to join the discussion here, but I'd rather gather my friends and have a real-life debate session.
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Tomara
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« Reply #124 on: July 23, 2011, 01:57:36 PM »

I'm not saying one is better than the other, I'm explaining why I like certain styles more than others. Plus, just because a game looks boring doesn't mean it's boring to play. Though a boring setting would still have a negative impact.

Why would comparing realistic graphics to the real world be wrong? The game is trying to look like it, isn't it? Say you've got a tree and then there's the digital tree that's designed to look like the real tree. I'll will probably be impressed with the level of detail and the skill needed to recreate the tree digitally, but that's it. It doesn't really give me a reason to look at it. At the same time it will constantly remind me that I'm playing a game, because the tree doesn't look quite right...

Of course, the tree is just an example.

The most immersive games are often the games with settings and styles that are unique and creative. Show me a screenshot of The Witcher 2 or Oblivion without any recognisable characters and I won't be able to guess which game it's from. Show me a similar Bioshock screenshot and I'll probably be able to tell you it's Bioshock, because the setting is distinctive in various ways.

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I would like to join the discussion here, but I'd rather gather my friends and have a real-life debate session.

Already had one of those. I won :P
« Last Edit: July 23, 2011, 02:03:12 PM by Tomara » Logged
Sagacious-T
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« Reply #125 on: July 23, 2011, 06:54:43 PM »

The Witcher 2 is an incredible, incredible game, and is leagues ahead of any JRPG released in the last 5 years
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Zadok83
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« Reply #126 on: July 23, 2011, 07:18:40 PM »

Not just jRPGs. I think the whole industry is going down slowly because of risk management and profit maximization.
I wouldn't be surprised if in 10 years I end up playing mostly indie games.

I'm already at that point.
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Prime Mover
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« Reply #127 on: July 23, 2011, 07:39:44 PM »

The problem with your reasoning is that you're essentially saying that one form of aesthetic is better than the other.
Well, in theory, he isn't saying that, but it does sorta come out that way. What he and (to a certain degree) I are saying is that realistic graphics are somewhat underwhelming because we see those sorts of things every day. NOW, that all changes when you create a photorealistic game that uses real things in very exotic ways that you wouldn't easily (or at all) find in real life. I've always been a fan of the Myst series, which is technically photorealistic in style, however even if all the items look like real objects, the way they are collected and re-sized, and beautifully crafted makes them very alien and surrealistic. I think this is an excellent example of how photorealistic style can be used to create incredibly evocative work.

I dunno, I'm more of the impression, these days, that there are good and bad examples of most different styles. I just see so many western games mindlessly clinging to photorealism, just because they are being aesthetically uncreative. But I could say the same for Japanese games and ultra-cliche anime style as well. I wouldn't say that any Tales games are particularly creative, aesthetically (even if I love them for other reasons).
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