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Deltora Quest ~The 7 Jewels~ OST
Catalog Number: VGCD-0130
Released On: December 21, 2007
Composed By: Hitoshi Sakimoto, Mitsuhiro Kaneda, Kimihiro Abe, Noriyuki Kamikura, Masaharu Iwata
Arranged By: Hitoshi Sakimoto, Masaharu Iwata, Kimihiro Abe, Noriyuki Kamikura, Mitsuhiro Kaneda, Nicole Katherine Brady
Published By: 5pb.Records
Recorded At: Unknown
Format: 3 CDs
Buy this CD from Play-Asia
Tracklist:

Disc One
Original Sound Source
01 - Theme of Deltora Quest -Orchestra ver.-
02 - Theme of Deltora Quest
03 - Del Castle
04 - Battle
05 - Sweep!
06 - Leave Your Parents
07 - The Adventure Begins
08 - World Map
09 - Chapter 1: The Forest of Silence
10 - Town
11 - A Character Appears
12 - Camp
13 - Chapter 2: The Lake of Tears
14 - Rescue
15 - Victory!
16 - Tom's Shop
17 - Are You Deceived, by Any Chance?
18 - Shock!
19 - Manus's Whisle "With This Smell"
20 - Thaegan, the Witch
21 - This is Settled!
22 - Jasmine's Mixing Room
23 - Chapter 3: City of the Rats
24 - Clean! Clean Yurunai!
25 - Building Dungeon
26 - Chapter 4: The Shifting Sands
27 - Stadium
28 - Great Success!
29 - Chapter 5: Dread Mountain
30 - Kin
31 - Fearful Gnome Tribe
Total Time:
72'58"

Disc Two
Original Sound Source
01 - Deltora Picture Book
02 - Blacksmith
03 - Chapter 6: Maze of the Beast
04 - During a Boss Battle
05 - Gem Get!!!
06 - The River Queen
07 - Puzzle Solving "chie"
08 - Puzzle Solving Clear!
09 - Chapter 7: The Valley of the Lost
10 - Guard
11 - Hurry, Hurry!
12 - Big Boss Battle
13 - Game Over
14 - Manus's Whistle "Hometown"
15 - Bonds and Bravery
16 - Resistance
17 - Chapter 8: Return to Del
18 - Doubtful Mokito's Mansion
19 - Tower of Illusions
20 - Disquieting Move
21 - Last Boss
22 - Great Victory!
23 - The Gems are Reassembled, and Into the Legend...
24 - Ending
Total Time:
57'32"

Disc Three
DS Sound Source
01 - Del Castle
02 - Battle
03 - World Map
04 - Chapter 1: The Forest of Silence
05 - Town
06 - Camp
07 - Chapter 2: The Lake of Tears
08 - Rescue
09 - Tom's Shop
10 - Are You Deceived, by Any Chance?
11 - Thaegan, the Witch
12 - Chapter 3: City of the Rats
13 - Clean! Clean Yurunai!
14 - Building Dungeon
15 - Chapter 4: The Shifting Sands
16 - Stadium
17 - Chapter 5: Dread Mountain
18 - Kin
19 - Fearful Gnome Tribe
20 - Deltora Picture Book
21 - Blacksmith
22 - Chapter 6: Maze of the Beast
23 - During a Boss Battle
24 - Gem Get!
25 - The River Queen
26 - Chapter 7: The Valley of the Lost
27 - Guard
28 - Hurry, Hurry!
29 - Big Boss Battle
30 - Bonds and Bravery
31 - Chapter 8: Return to Del
32 - Doubtful Mokito's Mansion
33 - Tower of Illusions
34 - Disquieting Move
35 - Last Boss
Total Time:
73'30"

I think it may be important that, at this point, we no longer refer to the music of Sakimoto as the "Sakimoto style." It is important that we now call it the "Basiscape style." Over time, the rest of the Basiscape crew have learned to compose using similar instruments and create even more music using the full orchestra, the harp, the choir, all somehow magically synthesized. So it is with this three disc set, the soundtrack for the Nintendo DS RPG "Deltora Quest."

Though each artist from Basiscape has significant representation on the soundtrack, the key contenders are Hitoshi Sakimoto and Mitsuhiro Kaneda. This is the first time, among the many Basiscape-composed soundtracks I've enjoyed, that I found myself most interested in Kaneda's work. Kaneda's compositions are consistently fresh and interesting, whereas Sakimoto's work, while still solid, tends to sound too much like a collection of unused b-sides from Final Fantasy Tactics. It's interesting to note that the composer with the smallest contribution was Masaharu Iwata, who only worked on four tracks. Surprisingly, it was one of Iwata's tracks that I found to be the cream of the crop for battle themes (disc 2 track 12).

The first two discs are "original sound source" discs (that is, the way they were originally written). Disc 3 is a compilation disc, cutting some of the music (or merging it into one track), and presenting it in its "DS sound source" format (that is, the way it actually sounded on the DS). It shouldn't come as a surprise that the least enjoyable disc to listen to is the third. However, even in this compressed, "dirty synth" format, the music sounds surprisingly bright and bouncy.

Do I recommend this soundtrack? Well...did you like everything else Sakimoto and crew have done in the last decade? Because honestly, this is more of the same. There is some variation in style, with a little more ethnic (African/drum) influence this time around. But ultimately, if you really like harp glissandos, of course you'll like this soundtrack!

Reviewed by: Patrick Gann



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