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Symphonic Suite Dragon Quest VII Eden no Senshitachi
Catalog Number: SVWC-7403/4 (reprint KICC-6306/7)
Released On: October 18, 2006 (reprint August 5, 2009)
Composed By: Koichi Sugiyama
Arranged By: Koichi Sugiyama
Published By: Aniplex (reprint King Records)
Recorded At: Unknown
Format: 2 CDs
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Tracklist:

Disc One
01 - Overture VII
02 - Morning in Eden
03 - Saraband
04 - Echo of Horns Throughout the Castle
05 - Strolling in the Town
06 - Heavenly Village
07 - Days of Sadness
08 - Memories of a Lost World ~ Moving through the Present
09 - Shadow of Death
10 - Fighting Spirit ~ World of the Strong
Total Time:
38'00"

Disc Two
01 - Sphinx ~ Mysterious Sanctuary
02 - Aboard Ship ~ Pirates of the Sea
03 - To My Loved One
04 - Sacrifice Dance
05 - Screams from the Tower of Monsters
06 - With Sadness in Heart ~ A Safe Haven
07 - Magic Carpet
08 - Over the Horizon
09 - Orgo Demila
10 - Triumphal Return ~ Epilogue
Total Time:
40'22"

Despite being one of the worst-received games in the series, the music for Dragon Quest VII is some of the most refined. Sugiyama continues to use the same melodic themes from previous games, using counterpoint and other variations to keep the classic melodies (Overture, Castle, Town, Flying) sound fresh. Additionally, some new, original themes are thrown into the mix. "Saraband" is one that I've loved since I first heard it in 2000. One that I hadn't noted in the 2000 recording, but kept me on my toes this time around, is "Sacrifice Dance." That is a beautiful song.

Now, this print of the DQ7 Symphonic Suite is the second print. Every DQ Symphonic Suite was not just reprinted, but actually re-recorded, around the time of Dragon Quest VIII's release (also coinciding Dragon Quest's 20th anniversary). The music was performed by the Tokyo Metropolitan Orchestra, and while some people have made disparaging remarks about the recording quality, I personally have nothing but good things to say about it. You have to turn up the volume on your speakers, as the post-recording mixers didn't see fit to normalize or "auto-loud" the volume. Personally, I think this is very important for an orchestral recording.

You'll notice that this print is two discs. It didn't need to be. The combined time for the two discs is 78 minutes, 22 seconds. That pushes the limits of a standard CD, but technically, a CD can go to nearly 80 minutes. Cut some silence at the beginning or end of a couple tracks and you'd be down to 78 minutes flat. In my opinion, it was a waste to make this album span two discs.

Time for the summary: even if Dragon Quest hasn't sent you into an ephemeral trance before, this may be the recording that does it. I have a fondness for DQ7's music (even though I feel the exact opposite about the PlayStation game), and this recording/performance is far superior to the original, in my opinion.

Reviewed by: Patrick Gann



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