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The Legend of Heroes Sora no Kiseki FC Evolution OST
Catalog Number: NW10103330
Released On: June 11, 2015
Composed By: Falcom Sound Team jdk (Hayato Sonoda, Wataru Ishibashi, Takahide Murayama)
Arranged By: Toshiharu Okajima, Yukihiro Jindo
Published By: Falcom
Recorded at: Okajimahal Studio Tokyo
Format: 2 CDs
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Tracklist:

Disc One
01 - Sora no Kiseki -Opening size-
02 - Whereabouts of the Stars Harmonica short Ver.
03 - The Byway of Departure
04 - Provincial City of Rolent
05 - Rock on the Road
06 - Sophisticated Fight
07 - Defeat!!
08 - Tower of Four-Wheels
09 - Under the Moonlight
10 - A Cat Relaxing in the Sun
11 - Secret Green Passage
12 - In my Heart
13 - How to Walk in Liberl
14 - Commercial City of Bose
15 - It's not Easy to Guard the Borderline
16 - Amber Love Lute Ver.
17 - The Steel Floor Blocking the Way
18 - We are the Capua Family
19 - To be Suggestive
20 - Pinch!!
21 - The Disappearing Star
22 - Seaport City of Ruan
23 - Suite White Flower Madrigal - Princess's Troubles
24 - Suite White Flower Madrigal - Knight's Grief
25 - Suite White Flower Madrigal - Each One's Expectations
26 - Suite White Flower Madrigal - Castle
27 - Suite White Flower Madrigal - Colisseum
28 - Suite White Flower Madrigal - Duel
29 - Suite White Flower Madrigal - Princess's Death
30 - Suite White Flower Madrigal - Finale
31 - Don't Let Him Go!
32 - Pride of Liberl
Total Time:
61'51"

Disc Two
01 - Creeping Crisis
02 - Wandering in the Darkness
03 - Studio City of Zeiss
04 - Black Orbment
05 - Peace Given by Darkness
06 - Leiston Fortress
07 - Engaged People in Secret Maneuvers
08 - Royal Capital of Grancel
09 - Amber Love Piano Ver.
10 - Gran Arena
11 - Challenger Invited
12 - Royal Castle
13 - Recapture
14 - Silver Will
15 - Hollow Light of the Sealed Land
16 - Ancient Makes
17 - Those Who Protect the Greatest Treasure
18 - Let's be Lively
19 - Release from the Spell, and...
20 - Whereabouts of the Stars Harmonica long Ver.
21 - Confession
22 - Decision to Leave
23 - Hoshi no Arikia
24 - Feeling Soar With the Wind
25 - Sora no Kiseki [BONUS TRACK]
Total Time:
68'37"

Full disclosure: I am a big fan of the original Sora no Kiseki FC soundtrack. It isn't as immediately gripping as you would expect from Falcom; in fact, it's one of the most laid-back JRPG scores I have ever encountered, but one that evokes a spirit of light-hearted adventure that perfectly complements the game. Even a good RPG soundtrack can wear out its welcome by the end, but this one actually grew on me over the course of play, and I still find myself frequently coming back to it.

Sora no Kiseki FC Evolution is an enhanced Playstation Vita port of the original game, released in Japan during June 2015. It boasts a graphical facelift, voice-acting, a variety of quality-of-life improvements, and a new arrangement of the original soundtrack. While more music is always good news, arranged soundtracks tend to be tricky beasts, and even the beloved Falcom Sound Team have fumbled them on a few occasions. Fortunately, Sora no Kiseki FC Evolution is a success, and one of the most consistent arranged soundtracks that I have ever encountered.

Arrangers Toshiharu Okajima and Yukihiro Jindo show remarkable restraint in their treatment of the original soundtrack. Almost none of the tracks are dramatically reworked. Rather, they are enriched by more live instruments, more varied instrumentation, and generally higher sound quality. Many of the arrangements make relatively small changes that dramatically improve the track. "Silver Will" is one of the most popular tunes from the original game, but I always felt it lacked the driving intensity you need for a late-game boss theme. Not so in the arranged version, where an aggressive backbeat ratchets up the intensity and some tastefully layered guitar adds menace without overwhelming the rest of the instruments. Every other aspect of "Silver Will" is essentially the same, but these small changes make it a strong contender for my favorite track on the album. It also perfectly represents the general approach taken by Okajima and Jindo.

Most of the other battle themes benefit immensely from this aural face-lift. There is a much greater emphasis on percussive elements this time around, which is hardly surprising since arranger Okajima is also credited as the drummer, and the results are generally positive. Light, energetic drumming and tasty ambient strings invigorate "Sophisticated Fight," without the loss of the original's relaxed charm. Heck, even "Pinch!!" is pleasant to listen to now, with its percolating drum-set and bongos. Unfortunately, a few stylistic choices mar some of the other battle themes. "To Be Suggestive" uses some shrill synthesized brass that tends to dominate the mix. The new version of "Ancient Makes" is much more intense, but it almost completely abandons the thematically appropriate electronic sound of the original and feels less distinct as a result. The more orchestral battle themes, however, are excellent.

In fact, the orchestral tracks are universally better here. The instrumentation is more layered, the tracks exhibit a larger dynamic range, and the overall sound is rich and warm. The original "Hollow Light of the Ancient Land" was already one of my favorite final dungeon themes of all time, but the arranged version outshines it in every way. "Secret Green Passage" and "How to Walk in Liberl" were both strong travel themes in their original incarnations, but they are even more evocative here. Even the "White Flower Madrigal" Suite has never sounded better. However, this also brings me to the one piece that was substantially reworked, and that is the title track, "Sora no Kiseki." Now a vocal piece, the arranged version of the opening theme makes interesting use of strings with acoustic guitar and the bridge has some lovely harmonies. It's not bad, but not nearly as memorable as its orchestral version. This feels like a missed opportunity, since an arranged version of the original would have been a real treat.

The original soundtrack established stringed instruments, and the violin specifically, as a defining aspect of Sora no Kiseki's signature sound. The violins are real this time, and they play lead more than ever, but the results leave me with mixed feelings. They gives some of the tracks a more organic timbre and further emphasize the general feel of the series, but the album's instrumental variety suffers as a result. I missed the accordion on "Rock on the Road" and the woodwinds on "The Byway of Departure." The lead strings also sound strangely anemic throughout the album, as the tracks that involve a combination of highly-produced elements and relatively unaffected strings tend to overwhelm the latter with the former. The issue completely disappears on the orchestral and chamber tracks.

I've thrown a few criticisms at this soundtrack, but I reiterate that the good far outweighs the bad. As a whole, Sora no Kiseki FC Evolution succeeds because it recognizes what the original soundtrack did well, and then frequently does it better. There are a handful of tunes that I prefer on the original, but the overall collection of music feels reinvigorated by these new arrangements. If you could only purchase one version of this soundtrack, I would advise you to go with this one.

Of course, this is a moot point if you are a Falcom fan. You should be used to buying five versions of the same soundtrack by now.

Reviewed by: Adam Luhrs



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