iTunes - Podcast RSS Feed - Podcast RSS Feed - News RPGFan YouTube Channel RPGFan on Facebook RPGFan on Twitter


RPGFan Social Links
Musashiden II Blademaster OST
Catalog Number: VPCG-84814
Released On: July 25, 2005
Composed By: Masashi Hamauzu, Junya Nakano, Yuki Iwai, Takayuki Iwai, Shigeo Naka (1-01)
Arranged By: The Surf Coasters (1-01)
Published By: Vap
Recorded At: Unknown
Format: 2 CDs
Buy this CD from Game Music Online
Tracklist:

Disc One
01 - Samurai Struck (Game Edit)
02 - A New Hope
03 - A New Hope (Industrial version)
04 - Mystical Princess
05 - Dark Legacy
06 - Boss Battle I
07 - Village of the Sacred Beast
08 - Silent Dialogue
09 - Gaia Serenade
10 - Gorpus' Vendetta
11 - Filled Heart
12 - Celestial Encounter
13 - Holy Power
14 - A Breath of Relief
15 - Soul Stalkers
16 - Miners' Woe
17 - Aqua Memory
18 - Secrets of the Deep
19 - Boss Battle II
20 - Scarlet Rage
21 - Shopper's Delight
22 - White Whale of Heaven
23 - Firewalker
24 - Symphony of Fire I
25 - Meltdown
26 - Symphony of Fire II
27 - Molten Menace
Total Time:
70'21"

Disc Two
01 - Battle Stations
02 - Jungle Journey
03 - Aeolic Guardian
04 - Courage
05 - Call of the Wild
06 - What...?
07 - Wrath of the Spider Queen
08 - Eternal Sorrow
09 - Mysterious Market
10 - Playing Dumb
11 - Anxiety
12 - Temple of the Ancients
13 - Vault Breaker
14 - Vixen Maiden
15 - Resurrection
16 - Random Recital
17 - Rockstar
18 - It's Showtime!
19 - Valiant Dreamer
20 - Fight For Justice
21 - Holy War
22 - Tension
23 - Dark Duel
24 - Last Battle
25 - Finale
26 - Mystical Princess (Casual version)
Total Time:
72'57"

I wasn't the biggest fan of the Brave Fencer Musashi soundtrack when it came out, but I had no reason to be skeptical of Musashiden II when I heard that Masashi Hamauzu and Junya Nakano were composing it this time around. Since I love them both, I was counting the days before this soundtrack came out. Unfortunately, it took a little longer than I would have liked for it to make it into my hands, but the result was worth it. I was a little iffy when I heard the surf rock theme (performed by the Surf Coasters), but as the soundtrack progressed, I was very happy with it.

People are bashing this album right now because they think it has too many filler tracks. Let me get that out of the way right now: I agree and I disagree. First off, while there are filler tracks, they're great filler tracks. If you put all of them together and burned a CD, it would be a stellar CD to play in the background while you're doing something. These fillers aren't bad, because most of them are memorable. I can say this confidently after listening to the album five times, although on my first listen, they were a little boring.

Hamauzu and Nakano love to use recurring themes in their soundtracks, and this outing is no different. In fact, there are two themes that appear throughout the album; one by Hamauzu and the other by Nakano. This works extremely well because their styles are so different. The first theme is present in "Mystical Princess" and the second is present in "Call of the Wild." These themes are very good and pleasing to the ear, and I loved hearing them again and again.

The highlights of the album are "Mystical Princess," which is a soothing ballad that introduces Hamauzu's main theme. It is absolutely gorgeous, and there is also a casual version of it that has a stellar percussion section. Hamauzu definitely knows how to rock a drum set. I really enjoyed "Village of the Sacred Beast," "White Whale of Heaven," and "Call of the Wild," just because they brought back nostalgic memories of Dewprism and SaGa Frontier 2. The beginning of "Call of the Wild" reminds me of "Dawn in Dense Woodland" from the Dewprism OST. "Firewalker" was a nice surprise, too; it starts off very organic in the beginning, but progresses into a Celtic inspired song with great (but subtle) chords. The bottom line is that there's a great variety of tracks here. Most of them aren't terribly original, but if you enjoyed the two soundtracks I mentioned above, then you can't go wrong.

There are two composers who worked on this album whom I did not mention: Yuki Iwai and Takayuki Iwai, also known as Wavelink Zeal. Their contributions to the album were small (only 3 tracks) not very impressive, and not very helpful to the album at all. But they're still worth mentioning: just not very highly of in this review.

Overall, I highly recommend Musashiden II. You may not get as much excitement out of it as you might have with UNLIMITED: SaGa or Dewprism, but it's still a unique experience regardless. A lot of these songs will still be in my playlist in a few years, I'm sure of it. I'm giving it a solid 8 out 10.

Reviewed by: Mike Wilson



Back




Featured Content
Revolution 60 Review
Revolution 60
Review
Random Encounter Episode 83
Random Encounter Episode 83
Podcast
Dark Souls II: Crown of the Sunken King Review
Dark Souls II: Crown of the Sunken King
DLC Review
The Walking Dead Season 2: Episode 4 Review
The Walking Dead Season 2: Episode 4
Review
NAtURAL DOCtRINE Gallery
NAtURAL DOCtRINE
New Media
Wasteland 2 Preview
Wasteland 2
Preview
Bik Review
Bik
Review