Hikaru Utada – Colors

 

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Review by · February 14, 2006

The “Colors” single, while not relevant to any videogame on its own, does contain the English version of “Hikari”, called “Simple and Clean.” this song was used in the American version of Kingdom Hearts, and that’s why we’re talking about it.

(In case you were interested in my thoughts about “Colors”: the song is not on “solid ground” musically, especially in terms of structure. But the instruments are nice, and Utada performs well on this song.)

The English lyrics are a fairly literal translation of the Japanese “Hikari.” Sometimes, almost too literal. The statements don’t always seem relevant, or even worthwhile. “Wish I could prove I love you: what does that mean, I have to meet your father?” I wasn’t impressed with this line. However, its 2nd-verse counterpart was great: “what does that mean, I have to walk on water?” That’s much more profound and hyperbolic.

English or Japanese, I’ve always preferred the PLANITb Remix to the original. I don’t think this song works nicely as a slow song. The remix, however, is outstanding, and it worked incredibly well with the opening video for Kingdom Hearts. If there’s one reason to buy this single, it’s the PLANITb Remix.

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If you already have the OST or the Japanese single, there isn’t much reason to have this single (unless you’re an Utada fanboy). If you don’t own any of those aforementioned products, and you like the English “Simple and Clean,” then you ought to get this soundtrack. Game Music Online still stocks it.

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Patrick Gann

Patrick Gann

Therapist by day and gamer by night, Patrick has been offering semi-coherent ramblings about game music to RPGFan since its beginnings. From symphonic arrangements to rock bands to old-school synth OSTs, Patrick keeps the VGM pumping in his home, to the amusement and/or annoyance of his large family of humans and guinea pigs.